What Gear is Essential

Bushwalking gear and paraphernalia. Electronic gadget topics (inc. GPS, PLB, chargers) belong in the 'Techno Babble' sub-forum.
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TIP: The online Bushwalk Inventory System can help bushwalkers with a variety of bushwalk planning tasks, including: Manage which items they take bushwalking so that they do not forget anything they might need, plan meals for their walks, and automatically compile food/fuel shopping lists (lists of consumables) required to make and cook the meals for each walk. It is particularly useful for planning for groups who share food or other items, but is also useful for individual walkers.

What Gear is Essential

Postby Joe » Wed 28 Mar, 2007 4:04 pm

Hey all,
As mentioned in other posts im planning a few overnight treks to see how i cope. For a 1 to 2 night walk what would you class as essential gear to take. I already have a nice small lightweight 2 man tent, billy, fishing rod and knife. Compass and GPS, camera. What else do you class as essential items to take?

Even suggestions as to foodstuffs would be great.

Cheers!
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Postby Son of a Beach » Wed 28 Mar, 2007 5:04 pm

A long time ago, I did a couple of walks where I forgot some essential gear (or bits that I'd lent to other people were broken or missing). After those il-fated trips, I vowed to make sure it never happened again.

So I then drew up a spreadsheet to cater for the purpose. I just have to enter the number of people, and the number of nights, and it will calculate how much of everything I need. It even includes menu options, and prints out a shopping list. (It's not in Excel format, so sorry, I can't share it with any Excel users.)

I'll copy/paste the basic lists from the spreadsheet that I use below, grouped into the 4 classifications that I use, based on whether they are important, and whether they can be shared with others in the group. When I take a group of inexperienced people, I send them a simplified version of this list to make it easy for them to pack.

It would be very interesting to see what other people take! So please post your own lists here.


EACH PERSON - MANDATORY

walking boots
back pack
sleeping bag
sleeping mat
cutlery (knife, fork, spoon)
crockery (cup, bowl, plate)
rubbish bag (zip lock bag)
water bottle OR yabbie straw
comfy shoes (eg, sneakers)
gaiters (mud/bushes/snakes)
hat (sun protection)
balaclava / beanie
gloves
waterproof clothes
underwear & socks
thermal underwear
cool clothes (eg, shorts & T-shirt)
warm clothes (eg, polarfleece pants & top)
very warm top (eg, wool/polarfleece jumper/jacket)

Group Share - MANDATORY

pans
stove
fuel bottle
lighters
tent
first aid kit
toilet paper
small spade
maps
compass
whistle
food
stove fuel


EACH PERSON - Optional

water proof pack liner
sleeping bag liner
torch & batteries
toiletries
sun glasses (snow glare)
camera & film
cards &/or book


Group Share - Optional

ground sheet(s) for tent(s)
scourer
utility knife / sharp knife
string
candle(s)
rope (pack hauling)
sunscreen lotion
Last edited by Son of a Beach on Sun 08 Apr, 2007 4:27 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Postby kantonysen » Wed 28 Mar, 2007 8:42 pm

It's a very comprehensive list, pretty well everything is included. My main concern is having enough gear to keep warm and dry. I often wear two layers of thermal T shirts one with long sleeves, a shirt and then wind stopper jacket over that. I generally wear micro fibre trousers and carry a light weight long john and a heavy weight one. If walking in none exposed areas, clearly this is a bit overboard.

In the early 70s I went with a party of young strong walkers into Federation Peak. This trip being prior to thermals being available; we nearly lost a member of our party through hypothermia. Since that time I've been very conscious of having gear that will keep me warm under pretty well all circumstances.
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Postby Son of a Beach » Fri 30 Mar, 2007 12:40 pm

I don't carry a GPS at all, so a lot of people would want to add that to the list these days. (I may even add it to my own list if I ever buy one).

The newer pure wool thermals (eg, Ice Breakers and the like) are exceptional. Not only are they warmer and better looking than the poly/nylon/whatever type, but wool is not aquaphobic, so it wicks the sweat away properly (so the sweat evaporates from the clothes, not from your skin, meaning you don't get so cold when sweating).

Only problems are that they are insanely expensive (at least the Ice Breaker brand is), and you have to be careful with your washing and drying as they could shrink.

Oh, yeah, another advantage of them... they don't pong half as bad after a sweaty day's walking! :D
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Postby Joe » Thu 05 Apr, 2007 2:21 pm

With the pots, pans etc that you guys take...what do you reccomend? I want something really light. I was thinking of just taking a small skillet/frypan and a billy. Was thinking I could pack all the food into the billy to conserve space.
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Postby tasadam » Tue 10 Apr, 2007 8:01 pm

A recommendation would be for the moderators of this forum to make a "sticky" so that the useful stuff can be easily located.
Or perhaps better, to create an area called "Gear" a break down for posts on specific equipment eg Cooking gear (including stoves, pots & pans), Tents Packs & Sleeping bags, FOOD, 1st Aid and other safety gear etc etc... Many people would find such a reference invaluable and irreplaceable, and it would evolve as new gear is released.

I found this list a long time ago, taken from a SES site somewhere and customized a bit... That site no longer exists. (But a big thanks to whoever put it together, I have been using it for years now...)
This list is not complete, as everyone has their own preferences as to what to take. There are things I don't take.
A break-down of a first aid kit would be useful.
This list doesn't cover food, again you will find people have their own preference.

My food list is pretty simple but would be eager to see what other people do....
Breakfast - 1 cup fibre plus, tea bag or two, milk powder, sugar for extra energy.
Lunch Ryvita, Tahini or Hommus, red onion, cheese, salami, carrot stick. Pack of tuna in a foil bag... All heavy but good...
Dinner instant pasta packs, sometimes Cous cous and a wet pre-packed sauce but they're heavy too. Cuppa soups.
Nibbles - Bushwalkers nut mix that I buy from a place in Deloraine, the name escapes me but they recenty moved and are now near Woolies.
One more important addition to my food list - Sustagen powder... Mixed up with water in a 1L wide mouth bottle, that stuff is amazing the kick of energy I get.
Also some dried fruit, nut bar or 2, can't think what else I do at the moment...

As well as this list, there is a useful list in the Chapman book South West Tasmania... I am sure it has copyright so I won't publish it. It's a good book, though...

I use stainless steel pots - one is a billy with loop handle, also used to store fragile or powder items in the pack, the other is a pot type where the handle folds over the lid & locks it shut.
My stove is shellite based. I have an Optimus 99. I bought an MSR Simmerlite, but it doesn't simmer (it roars even at its lightest setting which burns the bottom of dishes like pasta, and makes them boil over) so went back to my Optimus, a great stove. If money was no object, then perhaps the MSR XGK would do what I require. But only because the Optimus is getting old...

Cheers!
PS my 1st post, hi there!
PPS possibly my longest post in any forum... Hope it's useful!


Equipment Lists

There is not much difference between winter and summer walking in Tasmania. Summer conditions can turn into winter in a matter of hours. What you take with you in the way of Basic Equipment should be the same for all seasons. In the case where you are intentionally going into winter snow conditions to camp or search then specialised equipment must be taken. The following lists will guide you in the right direction.

BASIC DAY WALK EQUIPMENT LIST
Personal

RUCKSACK Strong construction, comfortable, and large enough for all equipment.
PACK SLING Two metres of 25mm climbing webbing, tied into a loop with a tape knot, and with a karabiner attached. For attaching your pack to the helicopter’s winch. :shock:
PACKLINER A large heavy duty, waterproof plastic bag. Lightweight garbage bags are not suitable. Note other items of gear inside your pack need to be in their own plastic bags.
PACK COVER These assist in waterproofing your rucksack and are a means of visual recognition.
SLEEPING MAT Full length, double layered closed-cell mat, or full length Therm-a-rest (expensive, or ¾ Therm-a-rest plus a small square of closed-cell mat (for feet and for sitting on).
TORCH & SPARE BATTERIES In case you are late back a head torch is the best for hands free walking. Petzl make a range of styles (Zoom or Duo) etc.
MAP Topographical map of area (recent). (Good luck getting any "recent" map from our gov't... :twisted: )
MAP CASE A see through plastic pouch keeps maps and notes dry.
COMPASS Good quality compass Silva or Suunto.
WHISTLE To be carried on you at all times. Tie onto compass lanyard.
POCKET KNIFE A good pocketknife has many uses.
WATCH Essential for good planning and for sticking to radio schedule times.
NOTEBOOK & PENCIL Useful for recording information or messages as you go.
WATER A plastic drink container at least 1 litre or a water bladder with a drinking tube that is accessible while you are walking.
EATING GEAR Mug, spoon.
FOOD Enough for 2 days just in case. Soups and drinks.
FIRE STARTERS Matches – Store in a waterproof container
Lighter – More convenient than matches but vulnerable to moisture.
Firelighters – Inner Tube
SPARE CORD 5m of 3mm cord for repairs and modifications.
TOILETRIES Toilet Paper in plastic bag. Toilet Trowel
SPARE PLASTIC BAGS Heavy duty, or zip top, Coles bags, etc. Many uses in your pack and while in camp.
FIRST AID KIT Personal kit for your own needs. Include Sunscreen and Lip Balm.
CLOTHING See Listing


Party Equipment (distributed amongst the group)

TENT A tent suitable to care for an injured party overnight in.
SLEEPING BAG & LINER A bag suitable to use to care for an injured party overnight.
Adds to warmth of bag and also keeps bag clean.
GROUNDSHEET A groundsheet with grommets in the corners that doubles as a tarpaulin is good.
STOVE Trangia or Similar.
FUEL IN BOTTLE Leak proof and bombproof, e.g. Sigg or Nalgene.1 litre.
FIRST AID KIT A suitable kit for all emergencies.
BINOCULARS Useful during a search.
RADIO (SES Supplied) Issued. Check batteries and aerial. Test before departure.

Optional Equipment (personal and party)

SUNGLASSES UV cut out. Protection from scrub
CAMERA & FILM Useful for recording accident scenes, SAR team at work, the view etc.
GPS (Personal or Supplied by SES) Useful for quickly pinpointing your location or accurately following a pre-planned route. Not a substitute for good navigation skills.
LIGHT ROPE Thirty metres of 7 mm nylon rope, useful for pack hauling and river crossing.


BASIC OVERNIGHT EQUIPMENT LIST
Personal

RUCKSACK Strong construction, comfortable, and large enough for all equipment.
PACK SLING 2 metres of 25mm climbing webbing, tied into a loop with a tape knot, and with a karabiner attached. For attaching your pack to the helicopter’s winch. :shock:
PACKLINER A large heavy duty, waterproof plastic bag. Lightweight garbage bags are not suitable.
PACK COVER These assist in waterproofing your rucksack and are a means of visual recognition.
SLEEPING BAG Good quality Holofil (bulky) or down (preferable) with at least a 3-4 season (-5-10) rating. A plastic bag inside the stuff-sack will help keep your sleeping bag dry in your pack. A compression stuff-sack will reduce the volume of a packed synthetic bag.
SLEEPING BAG LINER Increases insulating qualities of sleeping bag and keeps body oils from dirtying bag, cotton (cheap/bulky) or silk (compact/expensive). (Go the silk!)
SLEEPING MAT Full length, double layered closed-cell mat, or full length Therm-a-rest (expensive, or ¾ Therm-a-rest plus a small square of closed-cell mat (for feet and for sitting on).
DAYPACK Lightweight, stowable daypack for use on limited excursions away from pack or camp. (Use as food bag in your main pack)
TORCH & SPARE BATTERIES A head torch is the best for hands free walking or cooking.Petzl make a range of styles (Zoom or Duo) etc.
MAP Topographical map of area (recent).
MAP CASE A see through plastic pouch keeps maps and notes dry.
COMPASS Good quality compass Silva or Suunto.
WHISTLE To be carried on you at all times. Tie onto compass lanyard.
POCKET KNIFE A good pocket knife has many uses.
WATCH Essential for good planning and for sticking to radio schedule times.
NOTEBOOK & PENCIL Useful for recording information or messages as you go.
WATER A plastic drink container at least 1 litre or a water bladder with a drinking tube that is accessible while you are walking.
EATING GEAR Mug, bowl, spoon, (fork).
COOKING GEAR If needed billies should be squat & you need billy grips. Take a pot scourer.
FOOD Enough for 4 days plus one spare meal. Food needs to be nutritious, easy to prepare and packed in a leak proof way.
FIRE STARTERS Matches – Store in a waterproof container
Lighter – More convenient than matches but vulnerable to moisture.
Firelighters – Inner Tube
SPARE CORD 5m of 3mm cord for repairs and modifications.
TOILETRIES Toilet Paper in plastic bag. Toilet Trowel Tooth Paste & Brush Etc
SPARE PLASTIC BAGS Heavy duty, or zip top, bags, etc. Many uses in your pack to waterproof your gear and while in camp.
FIRST AID KIT Personal kit for your own needs. Include Sunscreen and Lip Balm.
CLOTHING See Listing


Shared Equipment (between 2 people)

TENT One between two, four seasons double skin, sewn-in floor, aluminium or fibre poles, and storm guys. (Macpac ‘Olympus’, ‘Minaret’, WE ‘First Arrow’ etc.)
GROUNDSHEET Used under a tent, prevents punctures in tent floor and extends the life of the tent. Also useful for bivouacs and snow caves. A groundsheet with grommets in the corners that doubles as a tarpaulin is good.
STOVE Fuelled by metho (gas is very inefficient in cold) e.g. Trangia or Sigg stoves.
FUEL BOTTLE & FUEL Leak proof and bombproof, e.g. Sigg or Nalgene.
Allow 200ml of metho, per person per day (generous allowance)
WINE CASK BLADDER Useful for water storage in camp.

Party Equipment (distributed amongst the party members)

FIRST AID KIT A suitable kit for all emergencies.
TRACK REPAIR KIT Suitable kit for repairing boots, packs, tents etc.
BINOCULARS Useful during a search.
RADIO (SES Supplied) Issued. Check batteries and aerial. Test before departure.
GPS (Personal or Supplied by SES) Useful for quickly pinpointing your location or accurately following a pre-planned route. Not a substitute for good navigation skills.
STROBE LIGHT (Supplied by SES) Useful for signalling at night.

Optional Equipment (personal and party)

SUNGLASSES UV cut out. Protection from scrub
CAMERA & FILM Useful for recording accident scenes, SAR team at work, the view etc.
CANDLE Short candles useful at night in camp help conserve battery power.
LIGHT ROPE Thirty metres of 7mm nylon rope, useful for pack hauling and river crossing.
MOBILE PHONE Can be useful on a less remote search, if your radio fails.
PERSONAL EPIRB For use only in an emergency when all other forms of communication are unavailable.
HELIOGRAPH Purpose-built signal mirror, compact and useful for attracting attention on sunny days.
WATER FILTER Necessary now in some areas although not yet publicised. Lightweight units are available.


SNOW EQUIPMENT AND CLOTHING LIST
Personal

BOOTS Winter quality good leather boots treated with Snowseal or similar or
Plastic Boots
BIVVY BAG Nylon or Goretex for use in snow caves, snow domes, extra insulation.
OVERMITTS To minimise wetting of mittens.
EXTRA CLOTHING For extra thermal protection
SUNGLASSES/ SNOW GOGGLES Protects eyes from UV.
Useful in bad weather.
ICE AXE For self-arresting and travel over icy slopes.
CRAMPONS For steep ice slopes.

Shared

TENT Must be a four seasons tent with double skin, sewn-in floor, aluminium or fibre poles, and storm guys. (Macpac ‘Olympus’, ‘Minaret’, WE ‘First Arrow’ etc.)
SNOW PEGS Aluminium V section. Hold in snow and windy conditions.
EXTRA GROUND SHEET For more protection between you and the ground.
STOVE &FUEL An MSR Whisperlite Stove, which runs on White Spirits, is more efficient in Winter snow conditions than the Trangia.
STOVE BASE 12cm square, 3mm ply, prevents stove sinking into snow and provides a stable base in muddy conditions.
SNOW SHOVEL For use in construction of various shelters.
CLIMBING GEAR To suit the teams situation.
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Postby Son of a Beach » Thu 12 Apr, 2007 8:36 pm

tasadam wrote:Nibbles - Bushwalkers nut mix that I buy from a place in Deloraine, the name escapes me but they recenty moved and are now near Woolies.


The name of this shop is "Wholesome House". I know this because I currently have the son of the owner here with me right now. :D He runs another Wholesome House health food shop in Mowbray. I go there for some bush walking supplies these days.
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Postby tasadam » Sun 15 Apr, 2007 8:21 am

I just made an update to the "Other Web Resources" page, but this link is probably valid here...

As is this link
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Gear Gear Gear

Postby norts » Mon 06 Aug, 2007 9:49 am

This is my basic gear list, I usually walk with a friend but we are both always self sufficient. Only group gear would be a rope, PLB and repair kit.
Pack- WE Expedition
Pack cover
bum bag- small - use it to carry munchies, compass, etc
Day pack - fold up
water bottle - 1 litre coke bottle with a drinking tube attached
Tent - Macpac Microlight
Tent Footprint - piece of tyvek
Sleeping Bag - Fairydown Viper
Sleeping Sheet - silk, homemade
Sleeping Pad - thermarest prolite 3/4
head torch - LED - spare batteries
Stove - Kovea titanium - gas
windshield - coke can
Bowl - aluminium - also piece of foil to go over bowl to use as a lid
Mug - stainless steel and small lid- I use mug and bowl as billies.
Billy grips
Lexan Spoon
Knife
Wine skin
Sun hat
beanie
Balaclava - light polypropolene
sunglasses
rain coat - Oringi NZ company that makes farm gear.
waterproof pants - Oringi
Fleece jacket - windproof
shirt - macpac bushshirt
t shirt - tech tshirt
shorts and/or long pants - depending on where going and time of year
socks - I use thorlos - expensive but worth it
Gaiters - macpac
Boots - garmont for off track or blundstone 208s for track walking
track pants - for camp - light nylon ones
thermals - top and bottom
Camp shoes - cheap version of crocs
waterproof socks - go well with the crocs
Spare socks
repair kit
first aid kit
matches -
Chux super wipes - I use one for a towel, half ones for cleaning, wiping down condesation, cleaning tent etc.
toilet paper
trowel
PLB
Camera
Food
I always use a pack liner( about to try a new silnylon one)
All gear that needs to be dry is in waterproof bags.

In winter there might be extra clothing.

Roger
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Postby tasadam » Mon 03 Sep, 2007 8:20 am

Just found another list on the net...
It's from a USA site so may not all be relevant. Regardless I posted the whole list, it could be useful if you are taking the car / trailer somewhere....
Remember if you're not sure what to take, feel free to ask on the forum.

Overnight Backpacking Checklist

(Choose items that match your trip plans and the expected weather conditions)

The 10+ Essentials
Extra clothing layer(s)
Map of area (in waterproof case)
Drinking water
Compass
Food
Headlamp or flashlight (with extra batteries/ bulbs)
First-aid kit
Sunglasses (with retaining strap)
Pocket knife
Sunscreen
Matches (in waterproof container) and firestarter


Hiking Clothing
Quick-drying pants/shorts
Fleece jacket or wool sweater
Short-sleeved shirts
Wicking long underwear (top/bottoms)
Long-sleeved shirts
Regular underwear
Warm pants (fleece or wool)
Quick-drying swimsuit
Fleece or wool vest


Outerwear
Rainwear (top/bottoms)
Fleece or wool gloves/mittens
Wide-brimmed rain/sun hat
Waterproof gloves/overmitts
Warm hat (fleece or wool)
Bandanna


Footwear
Hiking socks
Extra laces
Wicking liner socks
Gaiters
Hiking boots/shoes that match the terrain


Camping Gear
Backpack
Funnel
Day/summit pack
Matches/lighter
Pack cover
Cook set, dishes
Tent, tarp or bivy sack
Cooking/eating utensils
Rainfly
Drinking cup
Tent stakes
Pot grabber
Footprints
Biodegradable soap
Tent broom
Pot scrubber/dish towel
Sleeping bag (in waterproof stuff sack)
Plastic garbage bags
Compression sack
Resealable plastic bags
Sleeping pad
Water filter/purifier
Sit pad or sleeping pad chair kit
Water-purification tablets
Extra nylon stuff sacks
Water bottle(s)
Food (adequate supply for your trip)
Collapsible water container
Stove and fuel
Lantern


Personal Items
Toilet paper
Lip balm (with sun protection)
Toothbrush and toothpaste
Insect repellent
Small bath towel
Head net
Brush/comb
Trowel
Other personal toiletry items


Other/Extras
Altimeter
Repair/sewing kit
Binoculars
100-foot accessory cord
Field guides
Axe/saw :shock:
Camera and film
Money
Notebook and pencil
Photo ID
Travel games
Camping/fire permits, if needed
Watch/alarm clock
Fishing license
Weather radio
Trip Plan (left with a responsible friend)
Hiking poles
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Postby sarge » Wed 26 Sep, 2007 1:54 pm

Something important that many people don't think of is to include enough bandages in your first aid kit to deal with a snake bite. Snakes not being so prevalent in tassie but I did see one when I went hiking in Jan in Tasmania. Being an ex-army medic i am a bit of a stickler for a well stocked first aid kit! To properly deal with a snake bite you really need at least 4 crepe bandages plus material to make a splint (walking poles and rope can suffice). Other things i have found useful in first aid kits:

- plenty of blister pack gear and tape plus different sized bandaids, small scissors
- medicines to deal with effects of gastro
- antibiotics are a good idea in case of infected blisters or wounds
- antihistamine/hay fever tablets are useful for insect bites and allergic reactions
- safety pins, tape for strapping, note pad & pencil, antiseptic cream, tweezers

Make sure with any medications that you bring dosage information with you so you don't accidentally overdose. I cut the dosage information off the boxes and chuck them in the kit so they stay with the medicines.
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Gear

Postby norts » Wed 26 Sep, 2007 2:34 pm

Sarge, I use to work at School of Health of Portsea. I use to do pay down there.

I always carry some imodium (spelling) and water purifying tablets.

Roger
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Postby dee_legg » Mon 01 Oct, 2007 4:40 pm

hey everyone.
the only other piece of equipment i can really recommend is a head torch.
makes cooking in the dark and looking for things in the dark so much easier than trying to hold and torch at the same time.
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Postby Joe » Mon 01 Oct, 2007 6:40 pm

noone seems to have mentioned a towel. I had a small one on last trip and it was best thing ever at end of day to dry off. Chickers have those micor towels at moment for 2 bucks...they weigh nothing and take up no space,..
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Re: What Gear is Essential

Postby walkinTas » Sun 27 Apr, 2008 12:07 pm

taswaterfalls.com wrote:no one seems to have mentioned a towel.


"If you want to survive out here, you've got to know where your towel is." (Ford Prefect).

"The Hitch Hiker's Guide to the Galaxy has a few things to say on the subject of towels.

A towel, it says, is about the most massively useful thing an interstellar hitch hiker can have. Partly it has great practical value — you can wrap it around you for warmth...; you can lie on it on the brilliant marble-sanded beaches..., inhaling the heady sea vapours; you can sleep under it beneath the stars...; use it to sail a mini raft down [a] slow heavy river..; wet it for use in hand-to-hand-combat; wrap it round your head to ward off noxious fumes...; you can wave your towel in emergencies as a distress signal, and of course dry yourself off with it if it still seems to be clean enough.

More importantly, a towel has immense psychological value. For some reason, if a strag (strag: non-hitch hiker) discovers that a
hitch hiker has his towel with him, he will automatically assume that he is also in possession of a toothbrush, face flannel, soap, tin of biscuits, flask, compass, map, ball of string, gnat spray, wet weather gear, space suit etc., etc."
(THHGttG, chp 3)
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Re: What Gear is Essential

Postby sthughes » Fri 09 May, 2008 12:16 pm

Call me stupid - but I like to take a pair of ear plugs (the little foam ones you wear when using power tools etc.). They are great to wear to bed if it's noisy because of bad weather, snoring tent companion, animals or whatever! They weigh nothing, fit anywhere and can often really help with a good nights sleep when you really need it. :wink:
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Re: What Gear is Essential

Postby corvus » Fri 09 May, 2008 6:07 pm

Ok your stupid :lol: so am I as I do the same but with heavy duty ones however quite often I am the snorer :wink:
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Re: What Gear is Essential

Postby DaveNoble » Tue 13 May, 2008 5:35 pm

On long trips in Tasmania I carry a very small AM/FM radio - and use it to listen to weather reports (as well as cricket scores!). Many of the mountain areas now seem to have very good FM reception of the local ABC stations.

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Re: What Gear is Essential

Postby norts » Tue 13 May, 2008 6:07 pm

I agree David.I have a very small one. Not cheap if you want AM and FM.


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Re: What Gear is Essential

Postby Son of a Beach » Fri 07 Nov, 2008 11:55 am

This topic is no longer a 'sticky topic' because we now have the 'Standard Gear - Overnight or Longer' wiki page which we can refer people to.

Note that this by no means supercedes this topic, but is more like an FAQ answer than a sticky was, so that this topic no longer needs to be a sticky. Feel free to continue discussion in this topic and/or to add to (or suggest additions for) the Wiki page.
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Re: What Gear is Essential

Postby Son of a Beach » Tue 06 Oct, 2009 6:55 pm

There is also the BWT Inventory System (link in the pink bits at the top of pages in this forum) that can help people build and maintain gear lists (as well as food and shopping lists). This is based on my old spreadsheet and does much the same job.
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Re: What Gear is Essential

Postby north-north-west » Wed 14 Oct, 2009 7:31 pm

What about for a daywalk, in an alpine area, with two foot of snow on the ground and more on the way?

Walking back to MacFarlane Saddle from Spion Kopje/Wellington on Sunday, about noon I passed a pair going the other way. The log entry at the track head said they were doing a day walk into Tali Karng and back - a good hour down the track from where we met. No packs, no pockets, carrying nothing but one wooden staff and one map. Two thin layers on top, thin socks and runners (both dripping wet and muddy by then). No waterproofs, no beanies, no gloves, no nothing else. An extra three inches of snow fell between 1 and 3:30pm when I got back to the carpark.

Is this lightweight or light headed?
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Re: What Gear is Essential

Postby tasadam » Mon 05 Apr, 2010 8:38 pm

Some further discussion in this post.
Making this topic a sticky - good info here that will surely be added to over time.
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Re: What Gear is Essential

Postby Taurë-rana » Mon 12 Apr, 2010 7:31 pm

north-north-west wrote:What about for a daywalk, in an alpine area, with two foot of snow on the ground and more on the way?

Walking back to MacFarlane Saddle from Spion Kopje/Wellington on Sunday, about noon I passed a pair going the other way. The log entry at the track head said they were doing a day walk into Tali Karng and back - a good hour down the track from where we met. No packs, no pockets, carrying nothing but one wooden staff and one map. Two thin layers on top, thin socks and runners (both dripping wet and muddy by then). No waterproofs, no beanies, no gloves, no nothing else. An extra three inches of snow fell between 1 and 3:30pm when I got back to the carpark.

Is this lightweight or light headed?


Given what I carry on my way up a mountain even if it's not supposed to snow, it seems a bit light on. I carry (when solo), thermals, waterproofs, bivvy bag, PLB, down jacket, gloves, beanie, matches (I don't believe in dying of exposure to keep the fuel stove only rule), fleece trousers, head torch, GPS, map, first aid kit, i-pood trowel. I think that's about all! I just figure that if I hurt myself badly enough to need help, or go lost or stranded for the night, I want to be able to survive if the weather turns. It's unlikely, but if it happened I would be very grateful for the stuff I carry.
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Re: What Gear is Essential

Postby north-north-west » Tue 13 Apr, 2010 8:58 pm

I've gone out that light, but not in that sort of weather. Especially the footwear - I hate walking with wet feet. And if your feet are cold and wet, the rest of you is cold.

Ah well, there was no rescue so they obviously coped. Must be a lot tougher than me.
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Re: What Gear is Essential

Postby Liamy77 » Wed 19 May, 2010 1:02 pm

I think that the equipment needed is totally dependant on where you are and when you go there!
my overnight list for southern WA is completely different to QLD or Tassie. For example summer in WA has a hammock mozzie/ fly net and a bashar(kinda like a tarp over the top) Whereas in Tassie i am a bit soft and prefer a nice warm tent...
The 3 areas you HAVE to address are
1 Water
2 Shelter/security
3 food
this doesnt necessarily address comfort - just survival
Shelter / security can include fire starting, first aid, navigation as well as a tent btw.
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Re: What Gear is Essential

Postby WarrenH » Sun 20 Jun, 2010 4:01 am

Post removed, it transcended the boundary of this thread.

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Last edited by WarrenH on Tue 22 Jun, 2010 8:37 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: What Gear is Essential

Postby north-north-west » Mon 21 Jun, 2010 8:00 pm

Maybe the most essential thing is for the various Parks services to get sufficient funding to properly manage the land under their control?
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Re: What Gear is Essential

Postby corvus » Mon 21 Jun, 2010 8:45 pm

north-north-west wrote:Maybe the most essential thing is for the various Parks services to get sufficient funding to properly manage the land under their control?


Parks here have just had an injection of funds in our last budget so will be interesting to see where the money goes :)
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Re: What Gear is Essential

Postby WarrenH » Tue 22 Jun, 2010 7:50 am

My re-written post.

What gear is essential ? ... having common sense.

Essential gear for a bush traveller is not just camping gear or survival gear. For me essential gear is being able to put my brain into gear and being able to adapt my experience to changing conditions and not stuffing-up out in the bush, with even the most basic gear that I have.

Essential gear especially the survival gear, if it is left back in the tent or only a metre out of reach ... when needed, is not anything. It is just stuff. As in a complete stuff-up.

Essential gear must be placed where it can be got-at, instantly. One of my dear friends Allan G, carries the most amazing, complete and up to date survival gear ... but when he needed to get it, he couldn't reach it. Allan told me that the day he couldn't reach the gear when he needed it, he realised that it wasn't survival gear ... and it was less than 1 metre away from him.

From that day on, after Allan told me what happened, the placement of my essential gear now gets as much priority as having essential gear.

Even a leather glove can be an essential bit of gear in an emergency. The shot isn't from an emergency, it was just becoming familiar with emergency gear. One should practice with their essential gear.

Image


A Wilderness First Aid course enhances all essential gear. Knowing how to correctly use every item of essential gear, is as equally important as having it.

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