What Gear is Essential

Bushwalking gear and paraphernalia. Electronic gadget topics (inc. GPS, PLB, chargers) belong in the 'Techno Babble' sub-forum.
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TIP: The online Bushwalk Inventory System can help bushwalkers with a variety of bushwalk planning tasks, including: Manage which items they take bushwalking so that they do not forget anything they might need, plan meals for their walks, and automatically compile food/fuel shopping lists (lists of consumables) required to make and cook the meals for each walk. It is particularly useful for planning for groups who share food or other items, but is also useful for individual walkers.

Re: What Gear is Essential

Postby Moondog55 » Mon 17 Oct, 2011 1:31 pm

I'd like to hear the full story on what happened to Allen if he doesn't mind, it may help us all.
Ve are too soon old und too late schmart
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Re: What Gear is Essential

Postby windspeed_36 » Wed 26 Oct, 2011 9:10 pm

One other thing I tend to take when We go 3 day trail riding on bikes is a satellite phone. These are one of the best things to take if you can afford one.
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Re: What Gear is Essential

Postby gbedford » Fri 28 Oct, 2011 1:31 pm

When I was younger I did a few jogs over Mt Bogong and other places. The only essential gear carried was water. Then there were the odd day ski tours across the High Plains, Kosciusko. The only essential gear carried was water, a mars bar and a coat. Alpine climbs mean carry next to nothing or you will end up using what you should have left behind.

It is all relative to what you are doing and who you are. If you work on a might need it principle then that is the load you have to carry. Personally I have learnt that not having itis a risk worth taking.

Cheers,
Gordon
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Re: What Gear is Essential

Postby Tiffany » Sun 06 Nov, 2011 7:58 pm

This is my list for a longer trip and as I have written it for myself I have a lot of specifics but I find that if u know exactly the item you want to take and put it on the list then you are less likely to forget it when you mark off the list. Also if you see anythign else i need let me know cause I have a long trip coming up and dont want to forget anythign important.

Gear
Luggage Pack
hammock/tent
compact pillow
mat
Food Jerky
carb gel
cous cous
dried vegetables
tang
powdered milk
herbal tea
cereal
craisins
other food
clothes long sleeve shirt
pants
shirt/singlet
undies
jacket
hat
boots
swimmers
raincoat
hiking socks
bandana
personal towel - small
insect repellent
book
sunglasses
wet wipes
toilet paper
Cooking pot/billy
cooker
fuel
fork/spoon
bowl/plate
cup
scrubber
garbage bags (small)
Technical water bladder
drink bottle
knife/multitooll
toilet shovel
head torch
phone
compass
gps
maps
camping permits
rope
ipod
solar charger
string
trek poles
lighter
sunscreen
hand sanitiser
water treatment tablets
duct tape?
first aid kit
camera
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Re: What Gear is Essential

Postby Moondog55 » Wed 07 Dec, 2011 12:55 pm

Raincoat and jacket?
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Re: What Gear is Essential

Postby Lindsay » Thu 08 Dec, 2011 3:40 pm

Sleeping Bag?
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Re: What Gear is Essential

Postby Tiffany » Fri 09 Dec, 2011 6:23 am

Ah yes. Well the trip that this list was initially written for is in the middle of summer on the coast of QLD so warm enough to go without a sleeping bag and just take a llight sheet insert.
:)
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Re: What Gear is Essential

Postby icemancometh » Wed 28 Dec, 2011 3:31 pm

gbedford wrote:When I was younger I did a few jogs over Mt Bogong and other places. The only essential gear carried was water. Then there were the odd day ski tours across the High Plains, Kosciusko. The only essential gear carried was water, a mars bar and a coat. Alpine climbs mean carry next to nothing or you will end up using what you should have left behind.

It is all relative to what you are doing and who you are. If you work on a might need it principle then that is the load you have to carry. Personally I have learnt that not having itis a risk worth taking.

Cheers,
Gordon


I like

Some of these so called essentials lists are more packing lists that certain people carry rather than being truly essential.

On easy walks with no consequences try leaving one bit of gear behind and seeing if it's really essential
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Re: What Gear is Essential

Postby Son of a Beach » Fri 30 Dec, 2011 9:06 am

That's true. However, what's essential on one walk may not be essential on another. You can carry a rain jacket on every walk and never use it. However, I wouldn't suggest that leaving it out is a good idea, as it may be essential on your next walk. A rain jacket can be not used at all on some walks, and essential to actually staying alive on other walks.
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Re: What Gear is Essential

Postby icemancometh » Fri 30 Dec, 2011 10:02 am

I agree that it depends on the trip too Son of a Beach, but I think Gbedford was just trying to get people to think about how much is essential and how much is not. Some people's lists seem to be longer than the walks at times.,

I remember going on a walk with a friend of a friend and him showing up with a massive 90L+ pack that was absolutely overflowing (apparently he'd been to the States recently and had stocked up on lots of toys and fancy new gear) while the rest of us had some much smaller packs. I remember taking a 40L pack? and some more average sized 60L packs were also being used on said trip.

It ended up snowing on us on the last day out and if anything, the guy with the 90L pack was not the safest as his pace was so slow in the cold that he would've been in trouble if we were exposed more, whereas the rest of us were way ahead with our much lighter packs. That included our waterproofs and belay jackets. We foolishly expected him to be able to keep up with us too which was also our mistake.

So there you go, not a lot is essential on a trip and it varies depending on the trip and the people and the conditions, never forget the conditions. Use your head and think about it before deciding to take it or not.
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Re: What Gear is Essential

Postby Son of a Beach » Sun 01 Jan, 2012 2:49 pm

Yes, I agree. The difficult part is the unpredictability of what will be essential for what trip. Some stuff is obvious, and some is not (eg, weather is not always predictable). The hard part then is how much risk to take, and how much is unnecessary over catering for unlikely risks or risks that would not be life threatening.
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Re: What Gear is Essential

Postby Ent » Sun 01 Jan, 2012 6:23 pm

Hi

Having just dodged into Waterfall Valley to bag Barn Bluff and get a few kilometres up on the legs for the next big wander it is interesting to see the gear choices that many people take on their first big walk. The weather was magnificent and the track as dry as I can remember it. In such conditions anything would have been ok. Yet there have been times when almost blasted off the track by icy winds and driving rain. I have had friends trapped at WFV by heavy snow making the climb out by Kitchen Hut route near impossible. In fact, I was under done on water containers for the long hot day doubling my normal fluid intake.

Two experienced walkers from NZ had packed light minus the sleeping mats. Um? Sorry in Tassie foam mats just do not exist in any Parks run huts. Sure, this will not kill them but does make for some rather uncomfortable nights. In winter at Pelion I have seen walkers retreating to bed at 6.00pm as they had insufficient gear to keep warm. There appears to be a reasonable gap between comfortable and dangerous also between what one person considers comfortable and another not. So what is "essential" is largely personal choice.

However, I do question the logic of relying on light pack weight to bug out quick if the conditions turn nasty. To me that seems to be asking for trouble as a twisted ankle or white-out makes the safest option to stay put. Best be prepared to the worst conditions that your are likely to encounter. Beauty with modern fabrics and gear it need not weight a tonne to survive most conditions. All I ask is people have a good play with stuff before doing serious walks and be wary of the weight "race" at all costs.

Cheers
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Re: What Gear is Essential

Postby icemancometh » Mon 02 Jan, 2012 7:26 pm

Your last post brings up two things: paying attention to conditions and forecast conditions. And paying attention to your surroundings, ie thinking and using your brain, whilst out.

Being prepared is not just taking gear.

It could be things like food and water and ensuring you put enough of the right stuff in the tank at the right time. That's one thing people don't pay much attention to and then 'bonk' whilst out.



Responding to the posts above, a waterproof jacket isn't always essential nor a sleeping bag. Though sometimes that is also pushing the envelope and comfort a bit more for some people. And retiring early in winter isn't a problem either, it's natural and is smarter than staying up losing your body heat and wasting energy to keep warm. I know of some people who don't take big jackets in winter because when they stop they jump into their bags so their jackets would just be redundant and excess to their needs. I hadn't thought of that before but there you go...
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Re: What Gear is Essential

Postby Ent » Mon 02 Jan, 2012 8:02 pm

Um?

Forecast can and are often wrong. Last walk was forecasting rain but that did not happen. I have started walks in brilliant sunshine to be setting up camp at around five pm with the temperature heading below zero with driving rain. The forecast was for mild weather and woke up to a frozen tent. Using your brain in Tassie means being prepared for snow in January if going in alpine weather for many day walks. We had two groups at WFV. One headed to Windemere after a side trip to Lake Wills while the other back tracked home. We had reasonably pleasant weather and they were almost blasted off the track. As the crow flies probably no more than twenty kilometres apart at most. What forecast do you believe?

A common theme in reports from our SES is ill-prepared walkers rescued. I wish I could find the statistical break up but the number of walkers rescued appear to have a rather high number of none locals. Now prepared does not mean carrying huge packs it just means been able to deal with the conditions. With careful choices tested in similar conditions there should be no issues but if the strategy is to cut and run then I struggle with that concept.

Walking for some is a social event while for others a solitary thing. If your idea of fun is been forced into bed at 6.00pm then ok, but if it is not, then not much fun. Again personal choice. I have seen first hand people huddled around a hut heater clogging it up with wet clothing and looking miserable. Does not look like fun to me but it takes all sorts.

Cheers
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Re: What Gear is Essential

Postby igor » Wed 04 Jan, 2012 1:24 pm

north-north-west wrote:What about for a daywalk, in an alpine area, with two foot of snow on the ground and more on the way?

Walking back to MacFarlane Saddle from Spion Kopje/Wellington on Sunday, about noon I passed a pair going the other way. The log entry at the track head said they were doing a day walk into Tali Karng and back - a good hour down the track from where we met. No packs, no pockets, carrying nothing but one wooden staff and one map. Two thin layers on top, thin socks and runners (both dripping wet and muddy by then). No waterproofs, no beanies, no gloves, no nothing else. An extra three inches of snow fell between 1 and 3:30pm when I got back to the carpark.

Is this lightweight or light headed?

Its an adventure. If one wants to be dry and comfortable, just don't leave home at all. Sit there and watch a TV documental.
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Re: What Gear is Essential

Postby Chris » Wed 04 Jan, 2012 8:12 pm

igor wrote:
north-north-west wrote:Is this lightweight or light headed?

Its an adventure. If one wants to be dry and comfortable, just don't leave home at all. Sit there and watch a TV documental.

Can't help feeling that an adventure with a high chance of ending up dead is a bit beyond most people's idea of adventure.
How many of us would have the skills to survive in deep snow with only 2 layers of light clothing?
As they had recorded their trip in the logbook, presumably they would hope to be rescued if things went wrong. Sounds pretty irresponsible to me.
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Re: What Gear is Essential

Postby kbm63 » Tue 10 Jan, 2012 7:47 pm

Common sense, a sense of humor and ingenuity! No one can pack for every eventuality so the ability to improvise is essential - a small sewing/repair kit has meant being able to salvage a broken pack strap, tape together broken bits and pieces, regain modesty from wardrobe malfunctions ....It's always interesting to find the little treasures people have squirreled away in their packs as a result of past experiences - tape, laces, wire, superglue......!!
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Re: What Gear is Essential

Postby John Sheridan » Mon 16 Jan, 2012 1:54 am

A backpack is essential and I just ordered my Osprey - Exos 46 SuperLight Hiking Pack
-Size: Large
-Colour: Jungle Green

I just needed a pack I could use for a weekend,long weekend and or 10 day trip and was light but good, this has a frame so should be more comfortable.

Let me know if you think this pack is good, I did do some research, but I do like some feedback.

Cheers.
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Re: What Gear is Essential

Postby Bluegum Mic » Mon 16 Jan, 2012 6:05 am

John this is the exact pack I've just purchased. Its great. Obviously they've shaved weight with the buckles and straps they've used but the fabric on the pack is great and the buckles will be fine if treated with respect :-) Its extremely comfortable. I've only taken mine out with 10kgish in it and it was perfectly comfy. Its an amazing pack to see in the flesh. Very well designed.
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Re: What Gear is Essential

Postby walkinTas » Mon 16 Jan, 2012 10:55 am

I have the 58 in grey and orange. The main buckle on the hip belt is too light and tends to come undone under pressure. See how you go, and if it becomes a problem, replace it with something a little stronger. I use a 60l waterproof pack liner and I also bought a sea-to-summit pack cover. Mine is a very comfortable pack and I'm very happy with it.
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Re: What Gear is Essential

Postby John Sheridan » Tue 17 Jan, 2012 1:01 pm

I Just got the pack and all I can say is, bouncy,bouncy,bouncy,bouncy :)

It looks and feels nice, I will try it out with some weight and wear it to work, 20 minute walk to see how it feels, I have a mesh zippered bag I will be adding to the front for some more storage space, nice for wet stuff, ect.


Cheers
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Re: What Gear is Essential

Postby Bluegum Mic » Tue 17 Jan, 2012 2:20 pm

Yes it does look a little like a trampoline
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Re: What Gear is Essential

Postby Nuts » Tue 17 Jan, 2012 2:31 pm

A big bladder will fit in there.
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Re: What Gear is Essential

Postby John Sheridan » Tue 17 Jan, 2012 10:21 pm

I will probably put a Two litre bladder in there, but just have it there just in case I needed some extra water reserves, nice place to put a bladder and not take any space up it self, wonder if they include that in 49 litre capacity for the large Exos 46 or just the inside of the bag ???

Cheers.
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Re: What Gear is Essential

Postby mikethepike » Sat 21 Jan, 2012 10:38 am

I'm looking for a bit of advice here concerning waterproof over-pants - are they a 'necessary' item or are shorts and a decent parka enough. It seems to me that if you have a long parka extending below your shorts (and unfortunately mine don't), over-pants are not required even in extended periods of walking in rain. I did recently walk with someone who was wearing a durable looking pair of waterproof over shorts and that seemed a good option. Over-pants don't weigh much but it is more stuff to carry and I find that they are uncomfortable things and serve no purpose in river crossings where you'll get thoroughly wet anyway. Long over-pants could be useful if they could keep your legs a bit warmer if you are out in really cold windy wet conditions during say, November to April in Tassie - but do they? Thanks.
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Re: What Gear is Essential

Postby tsangpo » Sat 21 Jan, 2012 6:47 pm

mikethepike wrote:I'm looking for a bit of advice here concerning waterproof over-pants - are they a 'necessary' item or are shorts and a decent parka enough.


I've never owned a pair. For walking in anything above 0C without deep snow gaiters and board-shorts work fine for me. Overpants certainly aren't essential gear for survival, the only times I've found that I would have liked a pair was around camp when conditions were a bit ordinary.
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What Gear is Essential

Postby oyster_07 » Sat 21 Jan, 2012 8:00 pm

I never consider over-pants unless I'm going alpine. Most walking/climbing/active pants are water-resistant, and this can be increased by washing them in tech-wash (as you would a soft-shell or waterproof pants), and combined with waterproof gaiters they are plenty sufficient for non-alpine conditions.
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Re: What Gear is Essential

Postby icemancometh » Sun 22 Jan, 2012 8:24 pm

depends on conditions. IF it's really wet you will want them

On the other hand, knee length jackets are just annoying and heavy
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Re: What Gear is Essential

Postby nit666 » Wed 25 Jan, 2012 1:27 pm

I would say that 'essential' gear would really depend on where you are going and the conditions when you get there. I have been camping before with nothing but a piece of canvas, loaf of bread, and the clothes on my back but I knew the conditions. It wasn't going to rain, there was ample clean water available and it wasn't far to get out if we needed help.

So the list of essential items would really be determined by your knowledge of where you are going, and this knowledge is the most essential item imo.
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Re: What Gear is Essential

Postby mikethepike » Sat 28 Jan, 2012 8:46 pm

Thanks everyone for that feedback re overpants -much appreciated -

oyster_07 wrote:I never consider over-pants unless I'm going alpine.


Rain in the alpine country - yes I think I'd like to have them and they'd keep falling snow out of your gators/boots. I'm tempted to cut mine down so they fit over the gators by 100mm though they might need to be kept in place by velcro patches or similar if they were to be useful in deep soft snow.

icemancometh wrote:On the other hand, knee length jackets are just annoying and heavy


Hmm, I travelled in wet conditions with some in the group wearing knee length parkas and did wonder but rucksack space and weight when you're not wearing them are main reasons I've not seriously considered them. Your comment adds another reason to think that I'm unlikely to ever be in the market for a pair.
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