Gear List

Bushwalking gear and paraphernalia. Electronic gadget topics (inc. GPS, PLB, chargers) belong in the 'Techno Babble' sub-forum.
Forum rules
TIP: The online Bushwalk Inventory System can help bushwalkers with a variety of bushwalk planning tasks, including: Manage which items they take bushwalking so that they do not forget anything they might need, plan meals for their walks, and automatically compile food/fuel shopping lists (lists of consumables) required to make and cook the meals for each walk. It is particularly useful for planning for groups who share food or other items, but is also useful for individual walkers.

Gear List

Postby Damien » Sun 29 Jun, 2008 8:57 pm

With the lightweight gear discussion going strong I decided to actually weigh all of the gear I take on overnight hikes.
You can have a look at it here: http://www.wardriving.com.au/stuff/gear.pdf

I was surprised at the weight of a lot of the equipment that I consider essential.
I know that my gear list is comprehensive and doesn't exactly subscribe to the 'lightweight philosophy',
however I am keen to strip some non essential weight from my pack so any suggestions for change are welcome.

There are a few changes which I hope to make in the near future:

Change from Steripen Classic to Steripen Adventurer.
For winter camping, swapping the Thermarest Prolite 3 Small for an Exped Downmat 7.
Stripping weight from the First Aid Kit.
Add a Sparklite Fire Starting Kit.
Possibly add an EPIRB or Satellite Phone for extended hikes.
Damien
Atherosperma moschatum
Atherosperma moschatum
 
Posts: 51
Joined: Mon 03 Mar, 2008 9:16 pm
Location: Dubai
Region: Other Country

Re: Gear List

Postby norts » Sun 29 Jun, 2008 9:22 pm

Comprehensive list, I need to sit down and weigh everything .
Do you need hut booties and sandals?
I see you cook with gas, why not a a light weight stove, about 90 gms, then get a steel/ titanium bowl(trangia bowl) to use as a billie. A bit of aluminium flashing ( i usea modified disposable roasting dish) as a wind shield. It will weigh alot less than the trangia set. If you carry a steel/titanium mug you can brew up using just you mug. Then you always boil the right amount for a brew.
Your tent is heavy or is that for 2 ppl?
Do you need a leatherman wave, very heavy?
I thoroughly recommend the Downmat 7. I use the 3/4, I sleep so much better since I got it.

Roger
User avatar
norts
Athrotaxis selaginoides
Athrotaxis selaginoides
 
Posts: 1826
Joined: Wed 01 Aug, 2007 10:45 am
Location: Germantown Tas.
Region: Tasmania

Re: Gear List

Postby Damien » Sun 29 Jun, 2008 9:56 pm

norts wrote:Comprehensive list, I need to sit down and weigh everything .
Do you need hut booties and sandals?
I see you cook with gas, why not a a light weight stove, about 90 gms, then get a steel/ titanium bowl(trangia bowl) to use as a billie. A bit of aluminium flashing ( i usea modified disposable roasting dish) as a wind shield. It will weigh alot less than the trangia set. If you carry a steel/titanium mug you can brew up using just you mug. Then you always boil the right amount for a brew.
Your tent is heavy or is that for 2 ppl?
Do you need a leatherman wave, very heavy?
I thoroughly recommend the Downmat 7. I use the 3/4, I sleep so much better since I got it.

Roger


I forgot to mention that I would obviously leave some things out or switch them depending on the season and length of the walk. I don't carry both hut booties and sandals, just booties in winter and sandals in summer, however I have considered just switching to normal thongs that are more packable and much lighter but I like the Tevas and they are comfortable enough to walk in with a pack on.

Thanks for the stove suggestion, an MSR Pocket Rocket or Optimus Crux with just one of the the bowls and a lightweight windshield would work pretty well.
The tent is for 2 people, as is the stove and cookset. I tend to be stuck carrying the majority of the group gear between myself and my girlfriend.
I guess the Leatherman Wave could be left out or I could just carry a lighter version of the Leatherman such as the Skeletool, I have had to use it on a few occasions to repair gear but I guess it's not 100% necessary.

thanks for the feedback
Damien
Atherosperma moschatum
Atherosperma moschatum
 
Posts: 51
Joined: Mon 03 Mar, 2008 9:16 pm
Location: Dubai
Region: Other Country

Re: Gear List

Postby alliecat » Mon 30 Jun, 2008 10:08 am

Okay, I finally listed all my gear - some of the smaller items are quesstimates.

A couple of points:
The tent is a 2 person tunnel; but it's so comfortable with just me in it :)
I will probably replace the trangia burner and pot stand with my home made burner and stand from now on.

I think the only ways I could greatly reduce the total weight would be to go to a much lighter (1-person) shelter and a single winter quilt to replace the bag+quilt, and maybe a lighter pack too.

Don't panic if there's something that you consider essential that is not on my list - I've probably just forgotten it when I was putting this together, it doesn't mean I would walk without it :)

Code: Select all
Pack   Six Moon Designs Comet   822
Pack liner   plastic garden bag   200
Stuff sacks   Various    150

Tent   Tarptent cloudburst 2 + ground sheet   1320

Sleeping Bag   One Planet Cocoon 300   640
Winter Quilt   Jacks-r-better shenandoah   425
Sleeping Mat   ridgerest short + thinlight 1/8   320

Stove+pot   Mini Trangia   300
Windscreen   foil   20
Lighter/firestarter      20
Spork      10
Tea towel      30
Mug   plastic   50

Windshirt   Montane Lite-speed   165
Fleece   Mountain Designs fleece   300
Waterproof jacket   Montane Atomic DT   240
Waterproof pants   Montane featherlite   125
Gaiters   Kathmandu   300

Thermal LS top      210
Thermal long johns      240
Spare undies      50
Spare socks      100
Beanie+gloves      120
Insulated vest   250


First aid kit   REC2 first aid kit   125
EPIRB      240
Toilet paper      50
Trowel   iPood   75
Wipes      50
Camera      200
Compass      50
Knife      100
Spare rope/cord      100
Candle      50
Head torch      50
Electrical tape      30
Towel   62
Glasses case      20

   BASE PACK WEIGHT   7609


Boots   inov8 Roclite 318 GTX   636
Walking socks      100
Boxers      50
Shorts      250
Shirt   180
Hat      100
Walking Pole   240
      
   WORN/CARRIED   1556
      
   TOTAL WITHOUT FOOD/WATER/FUEL   9165


I usually carry around 600-700g of food per day, and 100-150ml of fuel per day (that's a bit excessive but I like hot brekkies.)

Cheers,
Alliecat
alliecat
Athrotaxis cupressoides
Athrotaxis cupressoides
 
Posts: 313
Joined: Thu 29 May, 2008 2:17 pm
Region: Tasmania

Re: Gear List

Postby Son of a Beach » Mon 30 Jun, 2008 10:13 am

I reduced the weight of my Trangia from 1500g to 250g for a cost of only $17 (from the large size Trangia, to something suitable only for single person usage). Now I can choose to take the large one, if sharing with other people, or the light version if catering only for myself.

See this forum topic for details: Convert 1500g Trangia to 250g Trangia for $17

It's still not as light as the new-fangled gas stoves, but it sure was good bang for buck. It needs a windshield added (foil baking tray type should do), but that won't weigh much.

EDIT: oops, I think I misread something in this topic - so my post above is probably not actually terribly relevant... sorry.
Son of a Beach
Lagarostrobos franklinii
Lagarostrobos franklinii
 
Posts: 6396
Joined: Thu 01 Mar, 2007 7:55 am
Region: Tasmania
Gender: Male

Re: Gear List

Postby alliecat » Mon 30 Jun, 2008 10:22 am

Son of a Beach wrote:I reduced the weight of my Trangia from 1500g to 250g for a cost of only $17 (from the large size Trangia, to something suitable only for single person usage). Now I can choose to take the large one, if sharing with other people, or the light version if catering only for myself.

See this forum topic for details: Convert 1500g Trangia to 250g Trangia for $17

It's still not as light as the new-fangled gas stoves, but it sure was good bang for buck. It needs a windshield added (foil baking tray type should do), but that won't weigh much.


Nice. What you've ended up with is essentially the mini-trangia witha lighter pot, but you've got the full set to use when you have larger groups. Sounds like an economical and flexible way to go.

The only way I could get lighter than the mini-trangia (or your setup) is by replacing the burner and potstand with my home made ones. They are made from aluminium cans and barely register on my kitchen scales (maybe 5-10g total)! And they were fun to make. Admittedly I had to consume a can of Guinness to make the pot stand. Still, somebody has to make sacrifices... :D
Haven't got a decent simmer control yet, but I'm working on it...
alliecat
Athrotaxis cupressoides
Athrotaxis cupressoides
 
Posts: 313
Joined: Thu 29 May, 2008 2:17 pm
Region: Tasmania

Re: Gear List

Postby DarkenRahl » Wed 02 Jul, 2008 5:42 am

Get a poncho to replace your pack cover and rain jacket.
Ditch the sleeping bag liner.
Use a stuff sack filled with spare clothes for a pillow.
Get a lighter tent/tarp/hammock. - This is a fairly cheap change.
Use one titanium pot and a plastic mug if you have to have one.
Get a titanium lightweight stove like a Kovea titanium 90g.
I usually make a Dakota fire when I plan on cooking on my walks and use the Ash to clean pots. If you can't use fire on your trips then keep the wilderness wash.
Use a foon only, no need for any more cutlery. Eat out of your pan instead of a bowl.
Replace your leatherman wave with a Victorinox Ranger.
You have a lot of water carrying capacity. Unless you are in a particularly dry area you only need a litre or two on you at any one time. Drink heaps when you get the chance and before your walks so you don't have to carry the water on your back.
Boil or purify/flavour your water instead of carrying a water filter.
My first aid kit consists of pressure bandages for the highly unlikely event of a snake bite, a space blanket, some bandaids and a bunch of pain killers, anti histamines, immodium etc. Most other stuff you can improvise in case of emergency and anything serious will need immediate evacuation and not a first aid kit.
Repair kit seems heavy, some duct tape rolled around a walking pole or a water bottle can solve many problems along with a few safety pins.
You have a lot of clothes. Maybe it's very, very cold where you are. I find rain pants over my regular pants are quite warm even in near zero conditions, combined with a pair of thermals it's toasty.

I'm constantly trying to cut down my weight but to do so is expensive as I need a lighter pack and sleeping bag and can't justify it right now.

Be strong and ditch some stuff! :)
This message may contain traces of nut, seed or egg.
User avatar
DarkenRahl
Nothofagus gunnii
Nothofagus gunnii
 
Posts: 12
Joined: Thu 26 Jun, 2008 4:35 pm
Location: Sydney

Re: Gear List

Postby tasadam » Sat 05 Jul, 2008 12:07 pm

DarkenRahl wrote:Maybe it's very, very cold where you are.

:lol:
We're in Tasmania.
http://www.parks.tas.gov.au/recreation/ ... index.html
and
http://www.parks.tas.gov.au/recreation/ ... g/was.html

Watch the weather
Tasmania’s maritime climate means that the weather can change very quickly – in alpine areas, hot and sunny conditions can become squalls, heavy rain and even snowfalls, within a very short time.

That means you must be prepared with warm, windproof and waterproof equipment at any time of the year and in any region of Tasmania.


Good luck with your hammock :wink:
Stay safe & enjoy.
User avatar
tasadam
Magnus administratio
Magnus administratio
 
Posts: 5932
Joined: Tue 10 Apr, 2007 6:58 pm
Location: Near Devonport, Tasmania
ASSOCIATED ORGANISATIONS: TasmaniART, Smitten Merino, Macpac
Region: Tasmania
Gender: Male

Re: Gear List

Postby scockburn » Sun 17 Aug, 2008 2:32 pm

Hi Damien. Good list and some great gear here. Some suggestions that I use and similar to Norts. I use Crocs as sandles and paired with water proof socks makes them more useful. A lighter weight stove and cook set might help too .I use Snow peak titanium giga power with the solo cook set. I carry water sterilization tablets ( the silver type) and that also cuts down on a little weight. I always struggle with the weight and am behind the 8 ball from the get go as I have a One Planet Strezlecki at 4200 . I love the pack but it is a heavy one and am looking for options to lighten. Any suggestions appreciated.
User avatar
scockburn
Atherosperma moschatum
Atherosperma moschatum
 
Posts: 99
Joined: Tue 22 Jan, 2008 6:41 pm
Location: Brisbane

Re: Gear List

Postby Tony » Fri 29 Aug, 2008 10:26 am

This is a list of what I carried and what the gear weighed in my pack for last weekend Snow Shoe trip in the Jagungal Wilderness area Kosciuszco National Park, Temperatures of around -16 ºC where experienced. I took two stoves and canisters as I use these trips for testing my stoves, some weight could have been save if I did not do this.

This trip was for two nights

Please feel free to comment.

Tony

Pack Golite Trek 1060.0g
Tent 4 seasons Black Diamond BetaMid+ snow pegs 1767.4g includes floor
WP pack liner 75.8g
Map case and maps 280.2g
Assorted stuff sacks 80.7g

Sleeping
Sleeping bag outer Fairydown 1030.0g
Sleeping bag inner Macpac snow flake 480.3g
Silk liner 122.4g
Sleeping mat Prolite 4 706.2g
Pillow (home made) 111.3g

WP gear
WP jacket Marmont Precip 350g
WP pants 329.3g

Clothes carried
Lowe polar fleece 530.0g
Thermal to heavy 234.8g
Thermal top light 201.2g
Thermal longs 172.0g
Socks spare x 2 220.8g
Balaclavas x 2 84.3g
Gloves spare + mitts + WP mitts 183.4g

Kitchen
Mug 59.7g
Xtreme stove in bag 329.7g
SUUL stove + max adaptor 22.6g
JetBoil GCS Pot 328.9g
Small pot in bag used also as bowl 145.4g
Small spoon 7.8g
Large Coleman Max canister full 358.6g
Small max canister Full 205.2g
Two windscreens 53.5g

First Aid kit + toiletries, matches and candle 372g.

Total weight carried in pack including pack 9.299 kg

Water carried varied between 0.6l to 1.8l.

Food
Scroggin 3 x 170g =510g
Muesli Bar 4 x 32.2g = 128.2g
Chocolate drink satchets 4x 21.2g = 84.8g
powdered milk in small ziploc bags 3 x 60g = 180g
Justrite Muesli cereal in ziploc bags 2 x 130g = 260g
Vita Wheat biscuits in container 82g
tea bags in small ziploc bag 26.5g
Total 1333g
plus 350 ml fine port 390g

total food and grog carried 1.723kg

Wheres the main course? some might ask, my walking partner supplied both evenings meals, I supplied the cooking gear.

Total weight carried on back 11.022kg (note the about 12kg pack weight mentioned in the photo gallery was done on my very old bathroom scales resolution 500g, the weights above where done on some scientific scales resolution 0.1g)

I had about 400g scroggin, one muesli bar and 40g of powdered milk left over. (and some tea bags)

The meals that Dave cooked where very nice, If people are interested I will post the recipies.

We used 231.2 g of fuel

Gear worn

Thermal top light 182.1g
Thermal top wool 271.5g
Pants Polartec stretch 268.7g
Gloves Thinsulate 98.8g
Wool undies 88.5g
Beanie 111.3g
Socks 2 pair 166.0g
Sunglasses 38.3g
Sub Total 1225.2g

Bum bag with Compass, small knife, torch, whistle, toilet paper, matches, film canister with personal details and medical history. 265.5g
Camera and bag 274.5g
Sub Total 540g

Total 1765.2

Scarpa boots size 48 XX (yes I have big wide feet) Weight incuding custom made orthotics 2.435.2kg
Gaters 225.3g
Ski stocks 588g
Snow shoes 1.692kg per pair
Full Skinout weight =17.7275kg + water
Last edited by Tony on Sat 30 Aug, 2008 8:22 pm, edited 4 times in total.
There is no such thing as bad weather.....only bad clothing. Norwegian Proverb
User avatar
Tony
Athrotaxis selaginoides
Athrotaxis selaginoides
 
Posts: 1896
Joined: Fri 16 May, 2008 1:40 pm
Location: Canberra
Region: Australian Capital Territory

Re: Gear List

Postby corvus » Fri 29 Aug, 2008 9:20 pm

G'day Tony ,
Many thanks for your comrehesive list and I will cross check against mine ,my intial thought is that I use a heavy WE pack which I feel suits all Tassie conditions as opposed to your Go Lite which may not,however some of my gear is actually lighter than yours :) go figure.
I will try to mirror your list but it is a wee bit thingy not to include your food dont you think(some of my overnight walk weight includes medicinal liquids :lol: ) which I dont count as weight.
Regards
corvus
collige virgo rosas
User avatar
corvus
Vercundus gearus-freakius
Vercundus gearus-freakius
 
Posts: 5538
Joined: Mon 23 Apr, 2007 7:24 pm
Location: Devonport
Region: Tasmania
Gender: Male

Re: Gear List

Postby NickD » Fri 29 Aug, 2008 9:42 pm

I have a WE Pack which weighs quite a bit more than a lot of other brands but its got such a good harness, designed for heavier weights i think it balances itself out anyways.
User avatar
NickD
Athrotaxis cupressoides
Athrotaxis cupressoides
 
Posts: 185
Joined: Mon 07 Jul, 2008 4:20 pm
Location: Travellers Retreat
Region: Tasmania

Re: Gear List

Postby corvus » Fri 29 Aug, 2008 11:24 pm

We have three WE Packs my original very basic EXP 1, sons EXP 11 and my new one ,harness on no 3 is the best I have ever used but perhaps if I could lighten my load I could use one of those new" Golite "type packs.
But then again would I need a Pack cover and a waterproof (not garbo bag) Pack liner MMn? and would it last 17 years like my WE Exp1??(which is still serviceable BTW)
Just a thought.
collige virgo rosas
User avatar
corvus
Vercundus gearus-freakius
Vercundus gearus-freakius
 
Posts: 5538
Joined: Mon 23 Apr, 2007 7:24 pm
Location: Devonport
Region: Tasmania
Gender: Male

Re: Gear List

Postby Tony » Sat 30 Aug, 2008 6:54 am

Hi Corvus,

thankyou for your comments.

my intial thought is that I use a heavy WE pack which I feel suits all Tassie conditions as opposed to your Go Lite which may not


You well my be right, but I have used this pack for over four years now and a lot of my walks are off track in some fairly rough country (rough by mainland standard) and it has handled everything I have thrown at it with very little sign of wear and it is also the most comfortable pack I have used. Until it gives me reason to I see no reason to replace it with a tougher heavier pack.

however some of my gear is actually lighter than yours go figure


Like a lot of members of this forum I have a budget (I am still supporting my University student daughter), I have built my gear up over many years and as money becomes available I am replacing my old gear with lighter gear, I still have a bit to go for my winter/snow gear, I have some more winter gear arriving soon and I am looking at a 1kg 4 seasons tent. With the stoves I was first time testing my SUUL stove and took the heavier stove as a backup it was also the first cold weather trip for the xtreme, I had some minor problems with the SUUL stove (I lost an o-ring and had no spare) but the Xtreme performed brilliantly and I am about to do some weight reduction surgery on it. The jetBoil pot was taken as I needed a 1.5l pot and I considered it was the best choice for the snow, it also performed brilliantly as we had to melt a lot of snow for drinking water and in combination with the Xtreme we could do this quickly and efficiently.

thingy not to include your food dont you think(some of my overnight walk weight includes medicinal liquids) which I dont count as weight.


You are right, I will do a food list of what I took this weekend and I will include the the dark brown liquid with alcohol in it (to stop it freezing of course) and post it. I will also post the weight of boots and snow shoes.

Tony
There is no such thing as bad weather.....only bad clothing. Norwegian Proverb
User avatar
Tony
Athrotaxis selaginoides
Athrotaxis selaginoides
 
Posts: 1896
Joined: Fri 16 May, 2008 1:40 pm
Location: Canberra
Region: Australian Capital Territory

Re: Gear List

Postby alliecat » Sat 30 Aug, 2008 12:51 pm

Hi Tony,

Nice comprehensive list. I'm curious about your tent - I have never seriously considered the pyramid style tents because I think the pole up the middle would drive me nuts. I think I'd constantly be banging into it and worrying about bring the whole thing down on my head. Have you ever had any problems with that design?

Also, I'm curious to know, what is the "1kg 4 season" tent you are looking at getting?

Cheers,
Alliecat
alliecat
Athrotaxis cupressoides
Athrotaxis cupressoides
 
Posts: 313
Joined: Thu 29 May, 2008 2:17 pm
Region: Tasmania

Re: Gear List

Postby Tony » Sat 30 Aug, 2008 4:50 pm

Hi alliecat,

I'm curious about your tent - I have never seriously considered the pyramid style tents because I think the pole up the middle would drive me nuts. I think I'd constantly be banging into it and worrying about bring the whole thing down on my head. Have you ever had any problems with that design?



Even though I have had the BetaMid tent for some years I have only used it three time and I have not had a problem with knocking over the poles,it was a bit windy the other night when I went to bed and the tent sides where flapping against my sleeping bag so I moved the poles over to a slight angle so I could sleep further away from the sides.

I probably would not recommend this tent as I found it difficult to set up in the snow and as it has no guy rope attachment points, I have some reservations as to how it would handle some real wind. Since I got my BetaMid Black Diamond have brought out a lighter version, I do not know how they perform.

Also, I'm curious to know, what is the "1kg 4 season" tent you are looking at getting?


The tent that I am looking at is a Mountain Hardware Skypoint 1 it is a single skin tent and is available from Moontrail. It is onspecial at the moment for US$169. it would probably sell for A$550 here.

http://www.moontrail.com/mountain-hardw ... point1.php

There has been a debate on BPL.com on the merits of a double skin tents vs single skin as double skin tents are supposed to keep you warmer and have less condensation problems (I have not had much of a problem with the BetaMid) but they are slightly heavier and I am still unsure what I will get, the Hilleberg Nallo tents are getting good reviews and are worth more investigation . Some other options is to make my own (some patterns on bushwalking.org/faq site) or modify one of my existing Mountain Designs Neutrino 1 tent to make it more robust, or put some guy rope points on the BetaMid, I have to do some more investigation.

I have just updated my Gear llist posting with my food weight and my complete outfitted weight, boots and all.

Tony
There is no such thing as bad weather.....only bad clothing. Norwegian Proverb
User avatar
Tony
Athrotaxis selaginoides
Athrotaxis selaginoides
 
Posts: 1896
Joined: Fri 16 May, 2008 1:40 pm
Location: Canberra
Region: Australian Capital Territory

Re: Gear List

Postby alliecat » Sat 30 Aug, 2008 5:32 pm

Tony,

Thanks for updating your list - I'm always curious to see other people's food choices as it always gives me new ideas.

Regarding the tent choices: I've just ordered a Nallo 2 (from moontrail as it happens) to be my rough weather tent - I expect it would be pretty warm though in summer, even in Tassie. In summer, and when I'm sure the weather wont be an issue, I find the tarptent Cloudburst to be wonderful. Have you looked at the tarptent products? They really are quite nice, though none of them are really what I would call rough weather capable. For one person, the contrail or the rainbow would be pretty comparable to the MH Skypoint 1 I think, and even a bit lighter.

As for the pyramid tents in rough weather, I believe that with extra guyout points it would be pretty strong. Mountain Laurel Designs make a similar tent and they sponsored a couple who did a 4000 mile trek up through Alaska using that design! I don't know how often they bumped into the pole though :)

Cheers,
Alliecat
alliecat
Athrotaxis cupressoides
Athrotaxis cupressoides
 
Posts: 313
Joined: Thu 29 May, 2008 2:17 pm
Region: Tasmania

Re: Gear List

Postby Tony » Sat 30 Aug, 2008 7:42 pm

Hi alliecat,

Have you looked at the tarptent products? They really are quite nice, though none of them are really what I would call rough weather capable. For one person, the contrail or the rainbow would be pretty comparable to the MH Skypoint 1 I think, and even a bit lighter.



thanks for that information, I would be interested in how your nallo2 goes.

I have a contrail it arrived a few weeks ago, I have not used it yet, it is a very nice well made tent. I plan to use it as my 3 season tent, I have read that it is not the best in high winds but as with everything you have to use it to see if it is suitable for your particular use. I paln to use it in about 3 weeks in the Blue Mountains, will do a report on it after that.

Tony
There is no such thing as bad weather.....only bad clothing. Norwegian Proverb
User avatar
Tony
Athrotaxis selaginoides
Athrotaxis selaginoides
 
Posts: 1896
Joined: Fri 16 May, 2008 1:40 pm
Location: Canberra
Region: Australian Capital Territory


Return to Equipment

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google Adsense [Bot] and 3 guests