Ideas on Carrying Camera Gear

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Ideas on Carrying Camera Gear

Postby JonnyBoy » Sun 27 Nov, 2011 11:42 pm

Wonder if anyone can help here please. Are there any backpacks which are geared towards carrying photographic gear or alternatively camera bags which attach to backpacks? I'm quite a serious photographer and for my trip to Oz next year would love to take my 'proper' gear (Nikon D90, couple of lenses) along. Trouble is it's quite heavy and bulky. I really don't want to compromise and take a 'basic' camera along but I want to be comfortable and not have to think about carrying separate bags etc. Has any manufacturer cracked this?!
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Ideas on Carrying Camera Gear

Postby oyster_07 » Mon 28 Nov, 2011 6:13 am

I know how you feel. I carry a DSLR and at least two lenses, but also carry a weatherproof compact.

In terms of big hiking packs there is nothing of note available. In terms of small day packs there are some, but the problem is that they are not 'technical' hiking packs and are as such not as ergonomic as dedicated hiking packs (especially in the harness department).

Lowepro makes the Photosport 100 and 200. I have the 200 and find it great for around town. It's alright on trails for long hours, but in my opinion a dedicated pack is best.

I recommend a dedicated hiking pack (in whatever size you need) and then a normal camera portage system that you simply have at the top of your pack. Your back will thank you for it.

Edit:
I also recommend a Joby GorillaGrip. It's a lightweight, strong, flexible tripod. You can attach them to trees, poles, packs, or make them cling to rocks. They will hold an SLR with zoom lens.
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Re: Ideas on Carrying Camera Gear

Postby photohiker » Mon 28 Nov, 2011 6:21 am

Yes and no.

You can get camera backpacks that take a little bit of gear, but usually not enough for overnight camping. Once loaded, they're not really equipped with a good enough harness system for distance walking.

There are a few systems designed to carry cameras on the trail, one being the Aarn photo pockets. I have a set of these and I've used them for a week's trip and they work well. They fit most of the Aarn packs and you can read more about those in their own topic here.

Some people bury their gear in their main pack and haul it out when they need it.

There are other methods such as chest packs and zoom pouches that attach to shoulder straps etc. Best to do the research as you are doing, and pick your poison :)
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Re: Ideas on Carrying Camera Gear

Postby JonnyBoy » Tue 29 Nov, 2011 4:10 am

Thanks for advice so far guys. I may have to experiment on a shorter hike. My concern is carrying weight elsewhere on my body could lead to aches and pains if I don't balance the kit well. Also, it has to be readily accessible ... You know how it is, the light will suddenly change or the clouds will turn dramatic and by the time I get the camera out I'll have missed the shot!
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Re: Ideas on Carrying Camera Gear

Postby Azza » Tue 29 Nov, 2011 8:06 am

I used to carry a Nikon d5000 slightly smaller than a d90 with a 55-200mm and a 17-55mm lens.
I never worked out anything for the lenses, but I had the camera in a Lowe Pro Bag, I'd sling the strap over my should use the carabiners to attach the bag to the waist strap of my pack harness. The camera would side just off my right hip and was quite comfortable to walk with.
It was more or less supported by the waist strap and was out of the way. I often walk off track in Tassie through thick scrub and never had any issues with the camera getting snagged or damaged. The position of the bag made it readily accessible.
Other people I walked with were more careful with their gear, perhaps if I'd had a more expensive SLR I'd not drag it through the muck.
But whats the point in dragging a heavy camera if you never get it out of the bag.

I never sorted out a system for lens changes though...
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Re: Ideas on Carrying Camera Gear

Postby photohiker » Tue 29 Nov, 2011 8:16 am

Azza wrote:I never sorted out a system for lens changes though...


Lets face it. While most lens changes are without problem, when you're out in the bush there is great potential for mayhem. The most amazing I've come across is tiny flies - a mate swapped lenses several times on a brand new D3 and started to come up with large blobs on his sensor. On close inspection, they were tiny flies that had entered the camera during lens swaps!

The problem with lens cases is that most backpack hipbeltss don't have enough room for them, or even the right shape to accept them.

Agree you're better taking a camera, any camera, that is easy to get at and you are more likely to use. If the gear is precious, then keeping it in the backpack and using it at times of minimum chaos is a good plan, just have something small light and preferably waterproof in your pocket for other times...
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Re: Ideas on Carrying Camera Gear

Postby Nuts » Tue 29 Nov, 2011 8:35 am

I have a D90 (and some bigger lenses), the best solution I found, left it behind!! :D
For general travel (or perhaps anything), lets be honest.. big price (cumbersome, fragile, heavy, expensive) to pay for unnecessary(?) image quality (and not medium format.. is it :) ) High end compact will have 'enough'(?) IQ and bits to twiddle.. so much better suited to overnight 'Bush'walking.
Azzas suggestion was probably second best.

Before their retirement I had two bodies, one slung (Azza style), had an 18-200, the packed one a 11-16. I had a Cannon 500D C/U lens and speedlight packed away.
Dedicated camera bags are good for daywalk stuff.
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Re: Ideas on Carrying Camera Gear

Postby wayno » Tue 29 Nov, 2011 9:09 am

Nuts wrote:I have a D90 (and some bigger lenses), the best solution I found, left it behind!! :D


even worse, i have a D300s with a 18-200 lens. i use a lowepro back slung over my shoulder so the strap goes round my neck and under one arm and put the straps under my chest strap.
i ended up buying a canon G12 instead to save on the bulk and weight.... only a quarter of the weight..
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Re: Ideas on Carrying Camera Gear

Postby Azza » Tue 29 Nov, 2011 9:10 am

I have a high end compact now, which I took on my recent Eldon's trip.
The lens on the compact is F1.9 and far better than anything I've got for my DSLR.
I'd toyed with the idea of having an 18-200 lens, but never got around to purchasing one.

I pretty much do what wayno does now... sling it over my shoulder and under one arm.
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Re: Ideas on Carrying Camera Gear

Postby phan_TOM » Tue 29 Nov, 2011 10:23 am

I have a lowepro bag that holds my DSLR with a wide zoom attached and a separate tele zoom (+ cleaning stuff/filters/spare batteries/etc) which I keep inside and near the top of my 85l pack. It seems like a bit of a hassle to get to sometimes but honestly I can have it in my hands in 10-20 seconds if I want it or set up on the tripod in under a minute which is nothing really and the gear is nice and safe. I tried rigging it a few different ways unsuccessfully off my pack, but if its good weather and good shooting I just keep the camera slung around my neck. In bad weather or if I'm feeling lazy/dont expect a lot I use a waterproof compact but the image quality leaves me wanting...

Nuts wrote:...For general travel (or perhaps anything), lets be honest.. big price (cumbersome, fragile, heavy, expensive) to pay for unnecessary(?) image quality (and not medium format.. is it ) High end compact will have 'enough'(?) IQ and bits to twiddle.. so much better suited to overnight 'Bush'walking....


I have to argue that point Nuts, there are photographers and then there are photographers.

For some, the highest possible image quality is paramount and anything else isn't worth the effort, I doubt Peter Dombrovskis or Ansel would have been anywhere near satisfied with a box brownie (the equivalent of a modern compact?) for example. Its true that the best camera is the one that you have with you but I regret taking my little lumix with me instad of my old DSLR sometimes as the images, even on the lowest iso etc, look as though I've rubbed dirt in my eyes before viewing them... If I could afford a few bodies I wouldn't worry so much :D

Some people just want to record a few snaps of their trip
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Re: Ideas on Carrying Camera Gear

Postby Nuts » Tue 29 Nov, 2011 10:56 am

I'd say there are photographers and there is photographic gear Tom :)
Peoples eyes haven't evolved since ansell or peter, if chasing fine art poster sized excellence why not carry large format cameras under the same 'argument'? Still see the quality to anything over a digital slr (though i bet they would be amazed at the quality from even a modern compact camera) I have the w/proof lumix, i'd agree its not superb from what ive seen but the LX5 would be more camera than many(most?) need quality wise.. (For the purposes of the 'outcome' rather than something being argued between obsessives with loupes lol ) Anyhow...

That is really off topic I guess, shouldn't have mentioned it maybe. Just what i'd do (hence the advice i'd give...) if coming from O/S and traveling ie lots of moving around, as many perils on transport/in backpackers accom. etc as in the bush..so on.. this guy has one body and a couple of lenses, when not carried slung that would fit in the top of a pack (would be 50/60L for me but to each their own)
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Re: Ideas on Carrying Camera Gear

Postby JonnyBoy » Wed 30 Nov, 2011 4:11 am

Thanks for the further input guys, developed into a very interesting read!
Off topic but quick anecdote.. I work as a Wedding Photographer and last year took on a 'trainee.' A mature guy, very experienced and technically competent photographer BUT... He turned up with an aluminium case and a lovely set of lenses neatly packed in foam. There was me with my D90 hand held and a spare lens in a hip sling. The guy tried hard but missed virtually every shot - by the time he knelt down, selected his lens and set up his camera the shot was long gone
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Re: Ideas on Carrying Camera Gear

Postby phan_TOM » Wed 30 Nov, 2011 8:57 am

JonnyBoy wrote:The guy tried hard but missed virtually every shot - by the time he knelt down, selected his lens and set up his camera the shot was long gone


You mean that he put his camera back in its neat little aluminium case after every shot and then got it back out again when he saw the next shot? :shock: Somehow I don't think that the guy is suited to wedding photography. Or wildlife photography, sports, journalism, candid, honeyeaters... :lol: I'm suprised that as your trainee you didn't instruct him to carry his camera around his neck, turned on...

I guess your comments highlight an important aspect in selecting an appropriate carrying system, it has to be mated to the specific needs and style of the photographer in question. You didn't say whether or not the bag was to be used for day walks around town or extended multiday expeditions to remote places, whether you are into birding, landscapes, everything, etc? For example, I generally like to shoot landscapes and natures details so I can plan my shot in regard to composition and then wait for the light cooperate :twisted: It usually means being ready around dusk/dawn and it usually means that I have plenty of time to have my gear ready to go and then I just sit around watching and waiting.

For daywalks, one of my friends uses a Lowepro slingshot, not sure which model, but as it only has the one strap it is easy to swing around in front of you and, with the side zip opening, pull the camera out and blaze away. It has enough room for everything that you could possibly want plus a rain jacket and water bottle. Might be an option?

Otherwise, for longer trips, I would take a good look at one of the f-stop gear packs like this one http://fstopgear.com/en/product/mountain/satori-exp which I would consider if it wasn't for the hefty price tag or this one http://fstopgear.com/en/product/mountain/tilopa-bc which 'might be handy as it is "Below the legal size limits for major airlines"

Theres a good review here http://www.ianplant.com/blog/2010/09/26/tilopa-photo-pack-review/
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Re: Ideas on Carrying Camera Gear

Postby Greenie » Wed 30 Nov, 2011 9:42 am

I am happy so far with my Lowepro photo sports backpack http://www.lowepro.com/photosport. But what I would like it something that can go with my larger WE Breakout pack for longer walks. Just not sure what to get for that? I am wonder if photo balance pockets will fit it. Or something that fits to my belt.
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Re: Ideas on Carrying Camera Gear

Postby Moondog55 » Thu 01 Dec, 2011 11:23 am

I carry a point and shoot little Canon A310 my beloved has a bigger Canon SLR but guess who has to carry both??
I just sewed on a couple of triangles to my shoulder straps and usually hang the LowePro bag from those, we orks like a chest pack, I can access the camera and lenses easilly enough, but taking the rucksac off is a pain, you need to unclip one side first before taking the arm from the shoulder strap, still isn't second nature and I have caught myself up more than once
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Re: Ideas on Carrying Camera Gear

Postby north-north-west » Sun 11 Dec, 2011 10:07 am

Aarn packs, with the camera gear in the balance pockets. Easy to get at, and big enough to carry a DSLR with wide angle or telephoto lens fitted. The specialised photo pockets have separate sections for spare lenses/bits and pieces, and all the inner compartments have their own dry bags. What could be more efficient?
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Re: Ideas on Carrying Camera Gear

Postby Mickeymoo » Tue 13 Dec, 2011 11:48 am

I have been carrying my camera gear in a top loading Lowepro bag (http://www.lowepro.com/toploaderpro) for a while now. It's worn on the front (it has it's own harness system, so can be worn without any other pack if wandering off from a base camp at sunrise/set looking for compositions etc), mine holds the camera body, wide angle (17-40mm) and small zoom (70-200mm) lenses, plus spare batteries, GND/CPL filters, remote release, cleaning gear etc.

As mentioned the bag comes with it's own harness system (while it's not a particularly great harness (no padding etc) it's only ever going to be taking 6-7kg of camera gear on it anyway and I haven't had any issues with it so far). I would usually put my camera bag harness on first then put the backpack on over top of it which works well. I think it also helps balance the weight a little better - i.e. the weight isn't all on your back.

The main issue I have with it is that when walking over scree slops or steep scrambling (i.e. W Arthurs in some places) it can be a little annoying as it makes it harder to see where you are placing your feet, but I have found I get used to it reasonably easily or just chuck it in the top of the pack for a little while if needed.
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Re: Ideas on Carrying Camera Gear

Postby Ent » Wed 14 Dec, 2011 11:36 pm

Hi

I agree with Nuts, the best camera is not a SLR for walking. I brought a Canon EOS 400D which was one of the more compact SLRs on the market at the time and it was painful. Unless a camera is carried on the front it is just too much a hassle to drag it out of the pack. Now finding a front fitting water proof camera bag that works with a pack that is not going to snag or push you away from the rock ledge that you are hanging on to is something I have not seen. I considered an Aarn pack simply because of the front pockets but still did not like the idea of not being able to hug the rocks. Yes, you can remove them but in Tassie it is a remove, replace, remove, replace, etc, type of experience. Still an Aarn is tempting though not to sure how they go carrying a big full framed SLR with low F stop lens.

As for the quality issue, well I chuckle. Many of us spend a fortune on the the latest and greatest and a few years later a much humbler camera kicks its butt. I have no doubt that a professional Canon D7 with L class lenses is brilliant but on an average walk it would be largely unused unless the photographer spends time setting up. And lets be serious, a top class photographer would be lugging a massively heavy tripod as well to eliminate camera shake. A tripod carrying walker moves slower than a three toe sloth :wink: Great photographs have a lot more to do with effort by the photographer than the gear. I admire people that do this but I am not one of those.

Final shot at the SLR obsessives is National Geographic back in the days of film. The magazine had photographs taken with 8"x10" full plate cameras down to 110. The 35mm were common but if you looked at the "adventure" shots the Lecia Viewfinder camera featured with a single fixed focus 35mm focal length lens being common with maybe a 135mm on standby if close in portrait shot was required. I challenge anyone claim that the results were not impressive.

Funny that at the moment the Lecia viewfinder type of format is now the new "thing". At least with the S90-100, ZX1 and LX5 high quality compacts are on the market after they had disappeared with the demise of the S70. The Canon G12 is probably the better camera still due to its viewfinder but from what I read the weight, cost, and bulk trade-offs with the S95 are not favourable enough to justify it.

I now use two cameras. A compact waterproof camera such as Canon D10 or Panasonic FT3. Big hint, buy the FT3 and use the D10 as a paperweight. For quality I use either a Canon S90 or Panasonic Lumix LX5. Both of them match or better the Canon EOS400 in at least 90% of the time in my humble opinion. For macro work an Olympus ZX1 is amazing. One thing I like about the S90 is I found a plastic case that it just fits in. It is a B&W International XS case and nicely rounded body of lighter weight plastic but still waterproof. Sure a Pelican case is far stronger but it hangs off your pack like a brick. The FT3 goes in the shirt pocket and the S90 or LX5 hangs from the chest strap. I find with these set-ups I take more pictures than I ever have with the SLR. The FT3 is used in typical alpine weather and the LX5 used on dry days or stored in a dry bag in the pack. The case for the S90 means it can be used on the shower type days.

Oh yes. Maybe with a decent front carrying system I might be tempted to take the SLR. Might be all the excuse a gear freak needs to upgrade to a newer higher range model :lol:

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Re: Ideas on Carrying Camera Gear

Postby phan_TOM » Fri 16 Dec, 2011 9:55 am

Ent wrote:I agree with Nuts, the best camera is not a SLR for walking


No, its not, but the best camera for taking photos whilst walking is an SLR. A good compromise between image quality and bulk, better image quality than a compact and far easier to manage than a medium or large format view camera. The desire needs to be there though.

Ent wrote:As for the quality issue, well I chuckle. Many of us spend a fortune on the the latest and greatest and a few years later a much humbler camera kicks its but...Great photographs have a lot more to do with effort by the photographer than the gear...


Aaahh, the trap of incremental advances in technology, the masses caught up in an endless upgrade cycle, lives owned by planned obselescence... So true Ent, there are endless forums with people who have the latest and greatest 50 megapixel cameras with $10,000 f0.95 lenses but only managing to post an endless supply of photos of their cat, and they can type for hours about how the noise and resolution is so impressive when zoomed in at 100% onscreen comparing pixels of said cat's whiskers... On the other hand there are blogs and websites with people on a tight budget who can only afford modest little cameras and the images that they take are awe inspiring. The compassion and empathy for their subject is palpable and the images are compelling and thought provoking. The old saying is true, the most important part of a camera is the 12 inches behind the viewfinder.

Ent wrote:And lets be serious, a top class photographer would be lugging a massively heavy tripod


Not true. There are plenty of options for robust, stable and lightweight tripods out there, even for top class photographers... If you can afford them :)

Ent wrote:A tripod carrying walker moves slower than a three toe sloth...


Some people don't even need that reason, I know a few who hit sloth top speed carrying very little, on a good day (no names, no courtmartials :D )

Cheers
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Re: Ideas on Carrying Camera Gear

Postby Nuts » Fri 16 Dec, 2011 10:38 am

Well, for my part i was kinda relating to the original post and just a few thoughts for someone traveling from OS to consider. Nothing more, as we still don't really know the travel plans. JB is obviously at a level where he would forgive this as general advice, I didn't pick up that he was a 'pro' :)

I do find it curious that with a vast range of sensor sizes and camera options it still falls back to mostly brand name SLR and a swag of fast lenses. I would have once thought this necessary too, to be seen as a Real photographer but (to me) it is more the Output that matters. What use outstanding images taken with fragile heavy gear when used for A4 prints or forum posts?

I don't consider myself much of a photographer. I did study photography between a few seasons, have owned some very nice gear and appreciate images worthy of large print. What i'm most impressed with these days are the advances made in getting such quality from tiny sensors. With the output being the key at some stage what practical use an SLR (for all but Real photographers) seems driven more by smoke and mirror marketing than considered choice.

Like to see a crop of my dogs whiskers (taken with a $400 $200 camera) :D
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Re: Ideas on Carrying Camera Gear

Postby phan_TOM » Fri 16 Dec, 2011 11:32 am

Nuts wrote:Like to see a crop of my dogs whiskers (taken with a $400 $200 camera)


:lol: :lol: :lol:


Good point about viewing prints though Nuts, we have a few fine art photo books in the collection at home (with Peter Dombrovskis being the obvious favourite :wink: ) and I don't think any of the images are much bigger than A3, if any at all. I'd love to have all the photos contained in the books printed at there max size plastered around the walls but I don't have the space & really they are plenty big enough for viewing at arms length (and wow!) and I'm sure most modern compacts would have the resolution to easily print at this size. I usually print photos from my measly 10mp camera at A4 (because I have an A4 printer at home) and have had A3/A2 prints done elsewhere that have turned out great. A mate gets 1 metre wide prints done for exhibition that look superb and he uses an 'old' 6mp Nikon DSLR... The dynamic range, colour rendition and bokeh of small sensor cameras are a different story though...
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Re: Ideas on Carrying Camera Gear

Postby Nuts » Fri 16 Dec, 2011 11:56 am

The Nikon D40? was a great little camera! Iv'e been finding that I loose very little (compared to what I expected) with the clunky p7000 but yes, at some stage in printed size (or experience) the deficiencies must show.

My first A3 prints were from a minolta compact (film) camera. I thought the results were wonderful everyone who saw the prints commented on how good they were. It wasn't until I started to get a better understanding of quality that I realised just how crap they were :)

My biggest concern these days is for carrying less, considering the amount of time ive been on the forum over winter gobbling lollies and researching light weight gear maybe iv'e lost the plot there as well :D
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Re: Ideas on Carrying Camera Gear

Postby phan_TOM » Fri 16 Dec, 2011 12:19 pm

Nuts wrote:What i'm most impressed with these days are the advances made in getting such quality from tiny sensors


Not just that, they're putting larger sensors in smaller bodies now by removing the mirror box (Sony NEX's for example) and then theres the minaturising of 'other teknomological bits' like processors & memory etc as well as the explosion of micro 4/3 type models meaning we're getting better image quality out of smaller units all the time. I love my 40D and I hope it has many years of service left (touch my head) but when it finally gives up the ghost I will no doubt seriously consider one of the smaller options out there. A Panasonic GX1 maybe? It probably has higher DR & out-resolves mine as things stand now!... Smaller, lighter, cheaper are good arguments...

Nuts wrote:over winter gobbling lollies and researching light weight gear


Hmmm, is it the chicken or the egg :lol:
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Re: Ideas on Carrying Camera Gear

Postby whynotwalk » Fri 16 Dec, 2011 12:45 pm

Ahhh - the perennial debate about compacts and DSLRs. I've opted to accept the pain of a DSLR (weight) for the gain (image quality).

But to make it more accessible I made (errr, my wife made) a neoprene, waist-mounted strap-on carrier, as pictured here. This has liberated my camera for instant use while walking. There are further details here: http://bushwalk.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=23&t=4677&p=55383&hilit=camera+bag#p55317

A US company called Zing Cases sell something like this. From memory B&H Photographic sell them.

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Re: Ideas on Carrying Camera Gear

Postby phan_TOM » Tue 20 Dec, 2011 1:22 pm

Nice work Peter (sorry, lynne!), certainly makes the camera easily accessible. It looks like it could handle some drizzle well enough or misty mornings, does it get stuffed in the top of your pack, as is, if it starts to get too heavy? (the rain I mean)
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Re: Ideas on Carrying Camera Gear

Postby whynotwalk » Tue 20 Dec, 2011 4:10 pm

Yes phan-TOM - it handles showers and even light rain. When the rain gets persistent and heavy, I put it in the pack. I reckon I take 3 or 4 times the number of photos I used to take simply because it's easy to access.

We all know how irksome it is to have to stop, take off your pack, get out the camera ... only to find that the wedge-tailed eagle (or whatever) has flown away :cry:

The only downside is the pull on the neck if I use a long (read heavy) lens and carry it all day.

cheers

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Re: Ideas on Carrying Camera Gear

Postby photohiker » Tue 20 Dec, 2011 5:29 pm

whynotwalk wrote:The only downside is the pull on the neck if I use a long (read heavy) lens and carry it all day.


What I've done with my admittedly smaller camera is to run the strap through the pack frame behind my neck, taking the weight off my neck altogether. This makes removing the pack a little more complicated, but I have quick release buckles on the camera to make that less of a chore.
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Re: Ideas on Carrying Camera Gear

Postby north-north-west » Tue 20 Dec, 2011 7:57 pm

photohiker wrote:
whynotwalk wrote:The only downside is the pull on the neck if I use a long (read heavy) lens and carry it all day.


What I've done with my admittedly smaller camera is to run the strap through the pack frame behind my neck, taking the weight off my neck altogether. This makes removing the pack a little more complicated, but I have quick release buckles on the camera to make that less of a chore.


I used to just drape the strap over the pack's straps behind my back. No weight on the neck, camera easy to get at, bag easy to remove.
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Re: Ideas on Carrying Camera Gear

Postby stoogest » Sat 31 Dec, 2011 9:30 am

I use what must be a pretty similar setup to Mickeymoo. I have a Lowepro Topload zoom that I sling over one shoulder and position at my front at about waist height. That way it's low enough for me to still be able to see where I'm putting my feet, but not so low that it bangs against my thighs when walking. The main benefit is ease of access. I can fit my Nikon D40 (very small and light, but gives great shots) with attached lens (either 18-55mm or 10-20mm) with the other lens fitting in the front pocket. Only downside is it's not waterproof and after a long day it does place a little extra strain on the shoulder.

In the last few weeks the zipper busted on it (it's been 3 years, not too bad an innings!) and I'm looking at replacing it with the Lowepro Toploader Pro AW 65 with the optional chest harness, as from all the reviews I've read it takes the strain off the shoulders and fits quite comfortably. It also comes with a waterproof cover that tucks away under the bag.

I've done a fair bit of research into the various bags out there, and you will not find one that does everything you want. For me though, the toploaders give you:
- ease of access (extremely important to me as I don't want to be stopping for 5mins every time I want to get my camera out of the pack)
- comfort (both fit and weight...although the Pro seems to be a bit heavier than my current setup..so that's yet to be seen)
- size (I want to be able to have at least two lenses and a couple of filters available at any time)

Hope this helps!
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Ideas on Carrying Camera Gear

Postby oyster_07 » Sat 31 Dec, 2011 10:12 am

At the risk of treading off-topic, BlackRapid make some great slings for cameras. They are like single-point QCB slings for firearms.

I'd suggest they would be suitable for use with a pack on as you can use movable stoppers to fix the position of the camera in the 'rest' position. That said, I only use mine without a pack. As it sits ergonomically across the chest, it is comfortable for all day wearing.

As for carrying camera gear while carrying a pack, I use a LowePro case (I have a couple) in the top of my pack. Works fine.
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