Hannels Spur Loop, Easter 2019, Parts 1 & 2

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Hannels Spur Loop, Easter 2019, Parts 1 & 2

Postby rcaffin » Mon 29 Apr, 2019 5:00 pm

My wife and I had climbed Hannels Spur in April 2006, shortly after the fires of 2003, and we thought we would take advantage of the newly cleared track and do it this time downwards. I don't think we had found all the original track in 2006 as several sections we did then cannot be found today. This includes the gully at 1000 m: I think we went straight across the saddle above the gully, camping in a nice flat spot in the middle.
Distances and height changes are fairly approximate. Most days were cold and windy - better than hot with March Flies of course!

Day 1 - 9 km, 150 m ascent/descent
We started from the 'Cesjacks' gate up near Jagungal at 1415 (drive from Sydney) and followed the old 4WD track along the Divide to Smiths Perisher. The old track up this seems to 'lost' now, so we went up at an angle to pick up the remains of the track at the top. A bit of scrub. We crossed the unnamed valley between here and the Bulls Peaks and camped in a nice spot at the top.
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Day 2 - 18 km, 350 m
An early breakfast and we were away heading along the valley just below the peaks. There used to be the remains of a reasonable 4WD track along here, but it was not visible today. Instead, a rather gross feature of today was a heavy smoke haze from farmers burning off outside the Park. We zipped past the Brassys at some speed.
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After passing Tin Hut at a distance we made a poor tactical decision to angle up the hills (the watershed) to Gungarten Pass. The scrub was very heavy, and we did not enjoy that at all. A better route would seem to be weaving through the grassy patches up the bed of the Valentine. Over Gungarten Pass we skirted hard left above the top edge of the huge scree field to hit grass on the side of the spur from Gungarten and followed that down the true left bank of what we call Schlink Hilton Creek, to the hut. It's not a bad route.
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The Schlink Hilton has been rearranged internally a little and it now has mattresses on some of the wire stretchers. Oh WOW!

Day 3 - 22 km, 400 m
The forecast for Perisher had been for overnight temperatures in the 2-3 C range. They were not too far wrong: -1 C actually, with frost. We were up at 0545 and away before 0700 for Whites River Hut - which also lives in a frost hollow!
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There's a mesh bridge across the river now, and the 4WD track up onto the Rolling Grounds is quite visible. We followed that up: it gets a bit vague and then disappears at the top, but no matter. A little bit of compass work had us at Consett Stephen Pass in short order. Guthega Dam below us looked a bit empty. There are even traces of a pad (or very old 4WD track) in places on the Rolling Grounds, but they don't persist. In fine weather it's very nice country.
We followed the fair track (remnant 4WD in places) around the side for a while, then climbed up on top and went over Mt Tate. From here on there was a visible foot track all the way. The Feldmark above Blue Lake seems to be doing well, now that
there is a visible track. A number of day walkers were headed for Mt Twynam.

Day 4 - 16 km, 1,500 m
A change in the night had brought much higher levels of cold humidity with it, so we had condensation inside the tent on the windwards side. Some of it dripped onto my quilt, making it look a bit wet, but the DWR held and I was able to mop most of it up. Another early start saw us keeping our thermal tops on for a little while.
From the saddle above Blue Lake there is now a flagged path for a considerable distance: to be deplored but the Great Lakes Walk sees 1000 or more day walkers every year.
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Now, laying all these flagstones is hard work, so the NPWS uses some Bobcats for the heavy lifting. The effect of the rocks on the rubber tracks is apparently severe, so maintenance is needed. At least they use tarps to keep the oil off the ground.
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There used to be some wandering across the (very rare) Feldmark patches on top, which was getting worse with the increased traffic, so today Lee and Northcote are bypassed by a rather long steel boardwalk - installed with really minimal damage to the surrounds.
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Again, to be deplored in the abstract, but the traffic levels are very high and at least the vegetation is now protected. Fortunately the interesting rocky bits above Lake Albina are, for the moment, preserved. I hope that continues. If you fall off here they might need a chopper to fish you out of the Lake.
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From Mueller Saddle we took the track to Mt Townsend to go over the top of Abbott Peaks and down to Byatts Camp. This was a really big mistake, as it took us over the granite boulders of the Western Fall. It also took us a long time to get down! But we did, picked up the cut track from Byatts Camp and followed that to the Hannels Spur signpost. The signpost does seem to be a trifle old ... especially compared to the shiny new one at the bottom.
Then down the cut track for a late lunch at Moiras Flat, picking up water at the signposted spring nearby. I can't say the the Flat is all that 'flat': a clearing maybe. The clearing they have done is valuable, but it will need to be repeated every year or two. The dead trees are still falling.
From Moiras Flat down to the saddles around 1000 m the track is very steep and is covered in much bark and dead leaves. Traction was very poor and I landed on my bum several times. Sitting down did not hurt too much, but getting back up without
sliding was sometimes tricky. We reached the first saddle about 1630 and stopped there. It is the one before any of the bumps. My knees were a bit jelly-like at this stage. There was not a lot of room in the saddle for a tent, but we managed.
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Day 5 15 km, 1,500 m
The track after the saddles is much easier - mostly. It does a lot of sidling around the steep hillside in places, which can be a bit slippery. I am sure when we came up in 2006 we missed a lot of the sidling and went straight up the crest of the spur. Anyhow, we eventually hit the old 4WD track at the bottom and cruised happily down to the rebuilt Dr Forbes Hut. The interior is a bit spartan - a plain concrete floor, but there is nice grass outside for camping.
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Continued in Part 2 because there is a 10 photo limit.
Last edited by rcaffin on Mon 29 Apr, 2019 5:12 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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Re: Hannels Spur Loop, Easter 2019, Part 2

Postby rcaffin » Mon 29 Apr, 2019 5:10 pm

We crossed the Swampy Plains River and had morning tea in the sun on the far side. Then we went up to the tarmac and followed that over the Geehi Bridge. We could have followed the 4WD track across the grasslands from Dr Forbes and over the Geehi ford to the NPWS gate, but the Geehi is bigger. Then a boring 5+ km up the tarmac to the Geehi Dam road, and another boring 6 km up that to the start of the Pinnacles FT. Snowy Hydro has markers at km intervals up this road.
I should point out two things here. The first is that this is not a 'fire trail' but a seriously engineered SMA road, now abandoned. The second is that for the full length of it, up to the Pinnacles, it is covered in hundreds of fallen trees: very large trees in fact. Shortly before Grassy Flat Creek the hillside is covered in tree ferns: a spectacular sight.
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We went up the track continuously stepping over and ducking under the fallen trees. The NPWS does not have the resources to clear this track, and frankly I do not want them to attempt it either. It is impassible to feral horse, ridden horses, MTBs and
trail bikes, and should stay that way - please.
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Yes, it really is like this for much of its length! Anyhow, we managed to find a flat grassy bit of the track to camp on. We had carried water up from Grassy Flat Creek. The 'FT' remains a 'road' though: it was hard getting even Ti skewers in place. There was rock under the grass.

Day 6 - 25 km, 400 m
We blythely stepped over and ducked under trees all the way to the top of the Grey Mare Range, for morning tea. Mind you, beware of the ants! From there it was fast hoon to the north along the dry range to reach the turn-off down to Grey Mare Hut.
Along the way we passed this magnificent unburnt snow gum.
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Grey Mare hut is nice but is suffering from over-use. Apart from the lack of mattresses (there used to be at least one big matteress there), the surrounds have been stripped of dead timber for quite some distance; what can be found is very old, lacks any volatiles and usually has a damp rotten core. The two saws at the hut are either very blunt or have an extremely bad set on the teeth. I found them useless.
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We managed a small fire, but that was all. It was really appreciated by the solo MTB rider (legal I think) who turned up well after dark. He slurped up some energy gels or whatever and collapsed into his sleeping bag. He should have stopped earlier.

Day 7 - 20 km, 250 m
Up bright and early (0545), breakfast and quietly away - leaving the bike rider snoring. North on the Grey Mare FT to the cairn for the Strawberry Hills FT. Well we found the cairn all right (because I knew where to look for it), but we found zero traces of the FT up the hill - and we did look. The scrub up the hillside is a very solid mass and about 1.5 m high. Progress was extremely slow. Eventually I dropped into the creek below to get some grass - we had skied down this a number of times and hoped it might be better. It was - a bit, so we made our way to the saddle at the top for morning tea in the shelter of some bushes.
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The view backwards from the saddle was nice, but what fire trail?
Anyhow, we were now on our much-loved Strawberry Hills, so we trotted across them, picking up faint traces of the old FT in places. It was never a 'fire trail'; it was a straight fencing maintenance track from the cattle days. Above the Geehi there is a prominent cairn on a boulder and some old fence posts. Last time across I found a cache of old fencing stuff somewhere near here: many bundles of star stakes and coils of #10 fencing wire. Must have cost a bit.
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We crossed the Geehi at one of the gravel banks and headed over the ridge to McCalister Saddle, down to Doubtful Creek and back up onto the Divide and the remains of the 4WD track there. We got back to the gate and car at 1600, which
meant we were in time for steak and veg in Cooma.
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Re: Hannels Spur Loop, Easter 2019, Parts 1 & 2

Postby wildwanderer » Mon 29 Apr, 2019 5:43 pm

Top report Roger.

What are the red (storage?) attachments you have on the back of your packs?
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Re: Hannels Spur Loop, Easter 2019, Parts 1 & 2

Postby north-north-west » Mon 29 Apr, 2019 5:49 pm

Neat. Certainly been some changes since I was last up there. Dr Forbes being rebuilt (and very nicely, too), and the Schlinck Hilton thoroughly revamped including an interior paint job. And those mattresses! Luxury.
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Re: Hannels Spur Loop, Easter 2019, Parts 1 & 2

Postby Zapruda » Tue 30 Apr, 2019 7:15 am

Great report, Roger. A real testament to the multiple routes you can put together through the park with a bit of planning.

I was out in the area over Easter and Anzac day onwards and was astonished at the amount of cyclists. On one of the rare occasions I was on track and passing Valentines hut there were about 20 tents pitched... No dramas with riding bikes on the management trails in Jagungal as far as I know. I have done it myself.

After passing Tin Hut at a distance we made a poor tactical decision to angle up the hills (the watershed) to Gungarten Pass. The scrub was very heavy, and we did not enjoy that at all


Yep, I have made that mistake a few times and you are right, following the upper Valentine to Gungartan pass is the path of least resistance.

Strawberry Hill trail - Unfortunately another one that has disappeared. I had no luck finding it last November. It would be a great way to link the open areas above with the Grey Mare trail.

Could you tell us a bit about your pack? I see an external frame/struts? Is it sil-nylon? Looks interesting.

Cheers,
Stef
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Re: Hannels Spur Loop, Easter 2019, Parts 1 & 2

Postby potato » Tue 30 Apr, 2019 9:58 am

Yep, here come the cyclists. Bike-packing has taken off as it provides easier access to remote areas. E-bikes will make bike-packing far more popular. While most stick to the designated management trails, there are a number who don't and will often ride, for example, the walking track between Thredbo and Kosci.
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Re: Hannels Spur Loop, Easter 2019, Parts 1 & 2

Postby Zapruda » Tue 30 Apr, 2019 10:31 am

potato wrote:Yep, here come the cyclists. Bike-packing has taken off as it provides easier access to remote areas. E-bikes will make bike-packing far more popular. While most stick to the designated management trails, there are a number who don't and will often ride, for example, the walking track between Thredbo and Kosci.


It certainly has become very popular, for better or worse... I say that as a long time bicycle tourer.

I was a bit shocked at the 30 strong group of bikepackers in Jagungal over Easter that was organised by a bike shop in Sydney.
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Re: Hannels Spur Loop, Easter 2019, Parts 1 & 2

Postby rcaffin » Tue 30 Apr, 2019 2:43 pm

e-bikes? That is a motorised vehicle, and I doubt that they would be legal anywhere in the Park. And what do you do for batteries after the first few hours? Allow e-bikes and the next thing will be full trail bikes. No Thanks!

My pack - ah well, MYOG. The tensioned frame has LenoLoc mesh strung over a curved Easton arrow shaft frame, but that needs custom couplings to hold it together. I had to make up the dies for that. The bag is the new Dim Poly LiteSkin fabric: utterly waterproof when new but long term reliability unknown as this was its first outing. Curious stuff.

Cheers
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Re: Hannels Spur Loop, Easter 2019, Parts 1 & 2

Postby potato » Tue 30 Apr, 2019 3:37 pm

Too late rcaffin - go walk the TVT where there are many e-bikes to be seen overflowing from the resort.

Nice walk and write-up btw.
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Re: Hannels Spur Loop, Easter 2019, Parts 1 & 2

Postby rcaffin » Tue 30 Apr, 2019 3:42 pm

I believe the Thredbo Valley Trail may actually be outside the Park or at least under the control of Thredbo. I may be wrong of course. I believe Thredbo is looking at separating the walking track from the bicycle track too, for obvious reasons.

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Re: Hannels Spur Loop, Easter 2019, Parts 1 & 2

Postby andrewa » Tue 30 Apr, 2019 8:09 pm

Having gone up and down last weekend with my daughter, and read about your issue with downhill traction, I was pleasantly surprised to find that my walking shoes seemed to have provided a lot more traction going downhill than my daughter’s runners. I didn’t slip at all.

The most unpleasant bit for us was between Bryant’s Camp and Wilkinson Valley, where route finding was more of an issue, and with a “surprise” hill in there. It was cold windy weather, and we were just over it.

We found a reasonably sheltered site well before the Wilkinson Valley. @JohnR had a nice sheltered site a bit further up the Wilkinson, but the best camping looks to be right up the top, which was probably an hour up from where we camped.

I’ve “ticked it off” for the second time in my life. Might go again if one of my other kids wants to do a “ big uphill hike”, but otherwise, nup!

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Re: Hannels Spur Loop, Easter 2019, Parts 1 & 2

Postby rcaffin » Tue 30 Apr, 2019 8:33 pm

Seen from the spur above Byatts camp (that is the correct spelling), we could see what looked like a clear track running up a spur from Byatts Camp to a saddle well to the west of Abbotts Peak. Finding the bottom of that track may take a little looking, but it was very clear further up. I should have taken a photo of it. Our BIG mistake was trying to go over Abbotts Peak in the first place.

Going down from Moiras Flat was a bit hard, but we had just spent a bit of time clambering over the granite boulders of the Peak, having come from near Blue Lake. Eh - my wife went down the hill faster than me, in the same NB joggers. Good soles though.

Cheers
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Re: Hannels Spur Loop, Easter 2019, Parts 1 & 2

Postby andrewa » Tue 30 Apr, 2019 8:55 pm

Yes, apologies for incorrect spelling.

We were also planning to return from Kozzie via Townsend and Abbott Peak to our campsite, but decided not to at the last moment. The detour didn’t look too bad, but no doubt would have been.

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Re: Hannels Spur Loop, Easter 2019, Parts 1 & 2

Postby paidal_chalne_vala » Wed 01 May, 2019 5:44 pm

Never again, I have now done it! .
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Re: Hannels Spur Loop, Easter 2019, Parts 1 & 2

Postby rcaffin » Wed 01 May, 2019 6:02 pm

Ah - the red things on the back of our packs. Missed that - sorry.
A4 map cases. I normally take A3 photocopies on waterproof paper instead of taking the real topo map. The waterproof paper lasts very well. I keep the A3 copies folded in half in plastic A4 sleeves, and they slide nicely into those red map cases. The top of the case is seriously waterproof and is held down with Velcro.

Paidal - up or down?

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Re: Hannels Spur Loop, Easter 2019, Parts 1 & 2

Postby nezumi » Wed 01 May, 2019 10:33 pm

Zapruda wrote:
potato wrote:Yep, here come the cyclists. Bike-packing has taken off as it provides easier access to remote areas. E-bikes will make bike-packing far more popular. While most stick to the designated management trails, there are a number who don't and will often ride, for example, the walking track between Thredbo and Kosci.


It certainly has become very popular, for better or worse... I say that as a long time bicycle tourer.

I was a bit shocked at the 30 strong group of bikepackers in Jagungal over Easter that was organised by a bike shop in Sydney.


As someone who has done some back-roads bikepacking but is yet to tackle any truly backcountry riding, I think that the two can co-exist. I don't think that the impact of a pedal bike in the bush is that much greater than foot traffic generally, and as long as general leave no trace principles are followed then there shouldn't be an issue.

The general guide to riding in the Jagungal from said bike shop has some great info, and good guidance. some of the key points they recommend:
*If you use the huts, support the KHA
*Know the legality of the track you are riding on
*Pack it in, pack it out

https://omafiets.com.au/pages/riding-in-the-jagungal
There are also a couple of organised not-races that pass through or around that area - the Monaro Cloudride and the Hunt 1000

rcaffin wrote:e-bikes? That is a motorised vehicle, and I doubt that they would be legal anywhere in the Park. And what do you do for batteries after the first few hours? Allow e-bikes and the next thing will be full trail bikes. No Thanks


On the matter of e-bikes, for *road legal* e-bikes (and for use on management roads etc, a bike must be road-legal), there is an assist speed cap of 25km/h and a maximum power assist of 250Watts. The purpose of this is not to be able to sit and cruise with no rider input, but to assist the rider on terrain where they would otherwise be forced to walk, or to allow them to keep up with fitter companions.
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Re: Hannels Spur Loop, Easter 2019, Parts 1 & 2

Postby Zapruda » Thu 02 May, 2019 7:10 am

nezumi wrote: As someone who has done some back-roads bikepacking but is yet to tackle any truly backcountry riding, I think that the two can co-exist. I don't think that the impact of a pedal bike in the bush is that much greater than foot traffic generally, and as long as general leave no trace principles are followed then there shouldn't be an issue.

The general guide to riding in the Jagungal from said bike shop has some great info, and good guidance. some of the key points they recommend:
*If you use the huts, support the KHA
*Know the legality of the track you are riding on
*Pack it in, pack it out

https://omafiets.com.au/pages/riding-in-the-jagungal
There are also a couple of organised not-races that pass through or around that area - the Monaro Cloudride and the Hunt 1000


My concern is that someone (Omafiets) thought it was a good idea to organise a group of 30+ people to ride together in a sensitive area like Jagungal. That's got to have a negative environmental impact for sure. The fact that there was that large of a group at Valentines hut is a good indication at the lack of forethought and planning by Omafiets. There isn't that much room there and no doubt damage was done to surrounding areas so they could pitch their tents.

I don't care that they were cyclists. It could have been a scout group, horse riders or bushwalkers. Its still far too many people on a weekend that probably sees the most visitors to the area out of the whole year.

And the information on the Omafiets website about Jagungal is vague and mainly focused on routes and bikes. No mention of the environment and how to avoid damage.

I am trip leader for a fairly large outdoor club and I have always made a conscious effort to have reasonably small groups on walks to avoid damage and our impact, as well as not being an eyesore for other visitors to whatever area we are in. I aim for 8 or less people and sometimes depending on the area, 5 or less.

Omafiets should really think about staggering and controlling the amount of riders for next years event so there aren't so many people in one location at a time. And just to note, this isn't an attack on cyclists. I am a very keen cyclist and bike tourer myself.
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Re: Hannels Spur Loop, Easter 2019, Parts 1 & 2

Postby rcaffin » Thu 02 May, 2019 7:13 am

I don't think that the impact of a pedal bike in the bush is that much greater than foot traffic generally, and as long as general leave no trace principles are followed then there shouldn't be an issue.
Sorry, but not true, either of the claims, at least in KNP.

For a start, NPWS used to allow bikes on the Lakes Walk, but they were doing serious damage on the non-flat parts because the ground is so friable (decomposing granite). Large erosion and skidding grooves were being made: completely unacceptable.

Second, the bikes (or the riders) were dangerous hazard to walkers on those non-flat sections as they could not control their bikes properly. Several times we were yelled at by a down-coming bike rider to 'get out of the way' because he could not stop to avoid us.

On hardened management trails not so bad, but still some riders manage to be too fast and dangerous. NOT happy.

My 2c.
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Re: Hannels Spur Loop, Easter 2019, Parts 1 & 2

Postby wander » Thu 02 May, 2019 8:24 am

Thanks for the lovely trip report and really nice selection of pictures.
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Re: Hannels Spur Loop, Easter 2019, Parts 1 & 2

Postby north-north-west » Thu 02 May, 2019 9:13 am

nezumi wrote: I don't think that the impact of a pedal bike in the bush is that much greater than foot traffic generally, and as long as general leave no trace principles are followed then there shouldn't be an issue.


Simple logic and observation show that this is incorrect. A cyclist has their weight plus that of their gear and the bike, all concentrated on two narrow points (ie: over less surface area than their feet), while generally travelling faster than a walker. Regardless of the surface, this must have a greater impact in regard to erosion and vegetation damage.
Then, as Roger has pointed out, there is the issue of control on steep and rough tracks.
As long as cyclists keep to dedicated bike tracks or MVOs we can deal with their presence, but co-existence is often difficult and the brunt of avoiding injuries tends to fall on the walker due to lower speed and greater maneuverability.
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Re: Hannels Spur Loop, Easter 2019, Parts 1 & 2

Postby potato » Thu 02 May, 2019 10:11 am

north-north-west wrote:
nezumi wrote: I don't think that the impact of a pedal bike in the bush is that much greater than foot traffic generally, and as long as general leave no trace principles are followed then there shouldn't be an issue.


Simple logic and observation show that this is incorrect. A cyclist has their weight plus that of their gear and the bike, all concentrated on two narrow points (ie: over less surface area than their feet), while generally travelling faster than a walker. Regardless of the surface, this must have a greater impact in regard to erosion and vegetation damage.
Then, as Roger has pointed out, there is the issue of control on steep and rough tracks.
As long as cyclists keep to dedicated bike tracks or MVOs we can deal with their presence, but co-existence is often difficult and the brunt of avoiding injuries tends to fall on the walker due to lower speed and greater maneuverability.


Also consider that bikes provide easier access. So as noted earlier, you may see more people at you favourite spot.

There is also a relationship between people numbers and impact on an area. Parks know that bikes make remote areas more accessible to more people, hence the restrictions on bicycle access, vehicles, horses etc in national parks.

Sorry, this is way OT now.
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Re: Hannels Spur Loop, Easter 2019, Parts 1 & 2

Postby paidal_chalne_vala » Thu 02 May, 2019 7:19 pm

We went Up Hannel's spur over Easter 2019. It just went up , up and up for bleeding ever!
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Re: Hannels Spur Loop, Easter 2019, Parts 1 & 2

Postby rcaffin » Thu 02 May, 2019 7:25 pm

It just went up , up and up for bleeding ever!
After many long trips in the European Alps, I now carry and USE an altimeter (watch). I find just knowing how much further it is at least in metres altitude very psychologically helpful.

Cheers
Roger
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Re: Hannels Spur Loop, Easter 2019, Parts 1 & 2

Postby puredingo » Fri 03 May, 2019 7:45 am

I really don’t understand the grief this walk has copped. I’m definitely no spring chicken and my fitness has never been as good as could be....but I found it a doddle.

The hardest part for me was finding the trackhead. I followed a NPs road from Geehi flats that had no gate for entry, which took me too far North (I think?) and ended at flat. I then crossed a river/creek and then crossed some swamps back around to the correct spur base...not a good start I thought.

Other than that I was actually cursing that I shelled out for the two topography maps as they never left my pack again. Also lamented the fact I humped so much damn water on my back. The creek midway would have been more than enough until I hit the tops.

Packed too much clothing too, the nights were pretty mild, actually had colder in the Blueys over Easter in the past. But being my first experience in the snowy Mountains safety first I guess.
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Re: Hannels Spur Loop, Easter 2019, Parts 1 & 2

Postby Zapruda » Fri 03 May, 2019 8:04 am

puredingo wrote:I really don’t understand the grief this walk has copped. I’m definitely no spring chicken and my fitness has never been as good as could be....but I found it a doddle.


Agreed, especially now that the track has been cut. It is no longer the scrub bash or nav challenge it was even a year ago.

Paidal Chalne Vala has history of making any walk seem like a death march. This might turn people off doing the walk who come upon this site looking for info on it. This in turn will have a negative impact on the track. If people are turned off walking it then it will eventually grow over and disappear again...
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Re: Hannels Spur Loop, Easter 2019, Parts 1 & 2

Postby paidal_chalne_vala » Fri 03 May, 2019 9:21 am

I like a bit of hyperbole to spice up my trip reports. The Diamantina spur, the NW spur and Hannel's Spur all rate as very tough Oz Alps ascents.
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Re: Hannels Spur Loop, Easter 2019, Parts 1 & 2

Postby eggs » Fri 03 May, 2019 10:06 am

Note on clothing warmth for the Main Range - I went up for a 3 day walk around Christmas some years back.
The overnight rain had frozen into ice drops by morning - so it can get very cold...any time of year....
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Re: Hannels Spur Loop, Easter 2019, Parts 1 & 2

Postby rcaffin » Fri 03 May, 2019 11:06 am

Weather on the Main Range in mid-summer:
You can expect ANYTHING from bright hot sun to frost, sleet, hail and even snow. We have had the lot. The wind comes up the Murray Valley and slams into the Western Fall.
We had sub-zero frost one night; other nights were only 1-2 C.
We had icy sleet on Boxing Day one year.
Yeah, it's 1,800 m.

Cheers
Roger
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Re: Hannels Spur Loop, Easter 2019, Parts 1 & 2

Postby north-north-west » Fri 03 May, 2019 11:53 am

puredingo wrote:I really don’t understand the grief this walk has copped. I’m definitely no spring chicken and my fitness has never been as good as could be....but I found it a doddle.

I wouldn't say a doddle but, while a fairly relentless climb until Byatts, it isn't as bad as so many trip reports make it sound.

I can say that now it's been long enough since I did it for my knees to have forgotten the pain...
"Mit der Dummheit kämpfen Götter selbst vergebens."
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Re: Hannels Spur Loop, Easter 2019, Parts 1 & 2

Postby Stew63 » Fri 03 May, 2019 6:46 pm

Hannels is just no fun any more now that all the good bits have been cut open :lol:
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