Why I hate hiking poles - 80% of the time!

Bushwalking topics that are not location specific.
Forum rules
The place for bushwalking topics that are not location specific.

Re: Why I hate hiking poles - 80% of the time!

Postby Orion » Tue 13 Jun, 2017 10:38 am

Mark F wrote:I had been using the same pair of Ruta Locura CF poles (120g each with mini basket) ... they are pretty durable.


Very interesting. Their website says 106g/ea without wrist straps or baskets. I don't need either straps or baskets for summer use. So 212g/pair and they're very adjustable too. Wow.

Do they flex much?

One downside is they don't compact as much as the z-poles. According to their website the Ruta Locura Yana poles telescope down to 78cm (or 71cm if you disassemble them). My BD adjustable z-poles fold and adjust down to 37cm. That was one of the big selling points for me as I can pretty much toss one into a small daypack and I barely notice that it's there.

One other downside: The Yana poles cost $270+shipping. Ouch!
Orion
Athrotaxis selaginoides
Athrotaxis selaginoides
 
Posts: 1373
Joined: Mon 02 Feb, 2009 12:33 pm
Region: Other Country

Re: Why I hate hiking poles - 80% of the time!

Postby Orion » Tue 13 Jun, 2017 10:41 am

RonK wrote:
Xplora wrote:
RonK wrote:Trekking in the Himalaya, I was amazed by the pace of European walkers. They use the poles to really drive along. After a little practice I could almost keep up with them. It's hard to consider anyone a dork when they have just blown you off the trail.

I suppose this is true if the object of the walk is to get to the end as quick as you can.

On the contrary - the object may be to trek further.


That's what got me started using two poles -- really long days. It's not even speed, really, just endurance. The poles make a difference over the long haul.

For more typical bushwalking distances I just carry one pole.
Last edited by Orion on Tue 13 Jun, 2017 10:42 am, edited 1 time in total.
Orion
Athrotaxis selaginoides
Athrotaxis selaginoides
 
Posts: 1373
Joined: Mon 02 Feb, 2009 12:33 pm
Region: Other Country

Why I hate hiking poles - 80% of the time!

Postby GPSGuided » Tue 13 Jun, 2017 10:42 am

Hey Orion, great things are rarely cheap! And Mark certainly has lots of carefully considered great gears and never a mistake to follow. At 100g/pole, that 78cm can be easily accommodated here or there. ;)

In the meantime, I'm still pleased with the short section of my CF Z-poles. The only unfortunate thing is, Asprey's strap setup is a bit long for our Zs, so have to lock it really tight to avoid dropping out. Not a problem with other packs with custom setup.
Last edited by GPSGuided on Tue 13 Jun, 2017 10:46 am, edited 1 time in total.
Just move it!
User avatar
GPSGuided
Lagarostrobos franklinii
Lagarostrobos franklinii
 
Posts: 6300
Joined: Mon 13 May, 2013 2:37 pm
Location: Sydney
Region: New South Wales

Re: Why I hate hiking poles - 80% of the time!

Postby Orion » Tue 13 Jun, 2017 10:44 am

GPSGuided wrote:Hey Orion, great things are rarely cheap! And Mark certainly has lots of carefully considered great gears and never a mistake to follow. At 100g/pole, that 78cm can be easily accommodated here or there. ;)


Certainly. It's always a matter of weighing trade-offs.
Orion
Athrotaxis selaginoides
Athrotaxis selaginoides
 
Posts: 1373
Joined: Mon 02 Feb, 2009 12:33 pm
Region: Other Country

Re: Why I hate hiking poles - 80% of the time!

Postby GPSGuided » Tue 13 Jun, 2017 10:48 am

Yes, and how quickly one cares to deflate that wallet and the ensuing questioning by the family. LOL
Just move it!
User avatar
GPSGuided
Lagarostrobos franklinii
Lagarostrobos franklinii
 
Posts: 6300
Joined: Mon 13 May, 2013 2:37 pm
Location: Sydney
Region: New South Wales

Re: Why I hate hiking poles - 80% of the time!

Postby madmacca » Tue 13 Jun, 2017 3:50 pm

ChrisJHC wrote:Finally decided to give hiking poles a go after 30+ years managing without them.

My observations:
1. Going up steep slopes - 2 poles brilliant
2. Going down steep slopes - 2 or 1 pole brilliant
3. The rest of the time - not sure what to do with them. Do I put them away and then have to fiddle around when I come to situations 1 or 2? Do I continue to use the double pole technique and look like a complete dork? Or do I stride along like a drum-major who's lost the rest of the band?

Thoughts?


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk


The other time poles are brilliant are river crossings. Allows you to keep 3 points of balance at all times.
madmacca
Phyllocladus aspleniifolius
Phyllocladus aspleniifolius
 
Posts: 512
Joined: Fri 14 Oct, 2011 11:18 pm
Region: Victoria
Gender: Male

Re: Why I hate hiking poles - 80% of the time!

Postby norts » Tue 13 Jun, 2017 10:18 pm

I suppose I had better put my 2 bobs worth in.
I am a convert to two poles, on the right tracks, which rules out alot of Tassie walking as far as I am concerned. Tassie for me is a one pole place.

But on the long distance trails in the USA 2 poles are brilliant, I walk faster. They cushion my knees on long down hills and help propel me up hills. I also have something to lean on when having a quick breather.

I use Black Diamond Cork Z poles( aluminium)
On the PCT I went through 2 pairs of wrist straps and two sets of tips/ baskets.

My single pole is a Volkstaf ( now called a Folstaf) A great pole and folds up small but is very sturdy.

Norts
User avatar
norts
Athrotaxis selaginoides
Athrotaxis selaginoides
 
Posts: 1686
Joined: Wed 01 Aug, 2007 10:45 am
Location: Germantown Tas.
Region: Tasmania

Re: Why I hate hiking poles - 80% of the time!

Postby GPSGuided » Wed 14 Jun, 2017 12:31 am

Those Tassie duckboards trapped my pole more than once, each with threat of snapping the tip off. Nasty stuff!
Just move it!
User avatar
GPSGuided
Lagarostrobos franklinii
Lagarostrobos franklinii
 
Posts: 6300
Joined: Mon 13 May, 2013 2:37 pm
Location: Sydney
Region: New South Wales

Re: Why I hate hiking poles - 80% of the time!

Postby Orion » Wed 14 Jun, 2017 4:19 am

I'm with Norts with regard to Tasmania. I need some room to work two poles (or one pole for that matter) and, with exceptions of course, Tasmania tracks tend to be a bit less roomy.

On really brushy trails I sometimes use a pole to whack the taller stuff. This works on some vegetation better than others and at times I've wondered if a sharp edge on my hiking pole might be useful.
Orion
Athrotaxis selaginoides
Athrotaxis selaginoides
 
Posts: 1373
Joined: Mon 02 Feb, 2009 12:33 pm
Region: Other Country

Re: Why I hate hiking poles - 80% of the time!

Postby Orion » Wed 14 Jun, 2017 4:22 am

Another use for hiking poles that I've read about is as a balance beam scale for measuring the amount of fuel left in a gas canister. If you set it up right it is reasonably accurate. I can't say I've ever bothered with this though.
Orion
Athrotaxis selaginoides
Athrotaxis selaginoides
 
Posts: 1373
Joined: Mon 02 Feb, 2009 12:33 pm
Region: Other Country

Re: Why I hate hiking poles - 80% of the time!

Postby north-north-west » Wed 14 Jun, 2017 10:33 am

Orion wrote:On really brushy trails I sometimes use a pole to whack the taller stuff. This works on some vegetation better than others and at times I've wondered if a sharp edge on my hiking pole might be useful.

They're great for flattening blackberry.
"Mit der Dummheit kämpfen Götter selbst vergebens."
User avatar
north-north-west
Lagarostrobos franklinii
Lagarostrobos franklinii
 
Posts: 9524
Joined: Thu 14 May, 2009 7:36 pm
Location: The Asylum
ASSOCIATED ORGANISATIONS: Social Misfits Anonymous
Region: Tasmania

Re: Why I hate hiking poles - 80% of the time!

Postby keithy » Thu 15 Jun, 2017 3:07 pm

I am a convert to using 2 poles in a variety of terrain. I only started using them when walking in Nepal a few years back but find them great for not only stability, but to increase my walking pace.

With stowing them, my Osprey packs have their "stow on the go" attachment which I use regularly.

The only time I'd move the poles from the "stow on the go" attachments is when doing some close up rocky scrambling - then I found the pole handles could get in the way. Otherwise they stay at my left side when not used.

When I was using a non-Osprey pack I made my own cinch strap from 5mm elastic cordage attached to the webbing on the pack's left shoulder strap to do the same thing the "stow on the go" system did. The other end of the poles went into the ice axe loops at the bottom of the pack.
User avatar
keithy
Phyllocladus aspleniifolius
Phyllocladus aspleniifolius
 
Posts: 549
Joined: Tue 28 Oct, 2014 5:31 pm
Region: Other Country
Gender: Male

Re: Why I hate hiking poles - 80% of the time!

Postby scroggin » Fri 16 Jun, 2017 4:26 pm

keithy wrote:I am a convert to using 2 poles in a variety of terrain. I only started using them when walking in Nepal a few years back but find them great for not only stability, but to increase my walking pace.

With stowing them, my Osprey packs have their "stow on the go" attachment which I use regularly.

The only time I'd move the poles from the "stow on the go" attachments is when doing some close up rocky scrambling - then I found the pole handles could get in the way. Otherwise they stay at my left side when not used.

When I was using a non-Osprey pack I made my own cinch strap from 5mm elastic cordage attached to the webbing on the pack's left shoulder strap to do the same thing the "stow on the go" system did. The other end of the poles went into the ice axe loops at the bottom of the pack.

Yay, Ive got an Osprey, I just now have to buy poles to utilise this feature
scroggin
Atherosperma moschatum
Atherosperma moschatum
 
Posts: 58
Joined: Mon 28 Oct, 2013 11:52 am
Region: Victoria
Gender: Male

Re: Why I hate hiking poles - 80% of the time!

Postby Neo » Fri 16 Jun, 2017 6:20 pm

In a short time, using two trekking poles has become second nature. I mostly do day/short walks.
Great for inclines and declines. You do get more speed on the flat.
When i come to a camber one pole is behind and one to the front (low side).
Have almost got the rhythm right for going up or down steps.
If the track is overgrown i hold them out front to deflect the scrub.
Really good for loose footings, creek crossings and poking ahead in suspect undergrowth.
Make sure you don't place them too far forward or they will arrest/break your momentum. I go in line with the opposite heal or just behind.
Also you can vary your walk by really pushing with your arms. It gets your core and other muscles working.
My helinox came with mini baskets but they drag on narrow tracks. I use them without any baskets. Even on sand they don't sink much past the tip.
I made a 'stow on the go'thingy for my waist pack similar to the Osprey setup. Or to just carry them until the next stretch is easy.
Kindly disregard 30% of comments after 5pm
Neo
Phyllocladus aspleniifolius
Phyllocladus aspleniifolius
 
Posts: 538
Joined: Wed 31 Aug, 2016 4:53 pm
Location: Port Macquarie NSW
Region: New South Wales
Gender: Male

Re: Why I hate hiking poles - 80% of the time!

Postby Neo » Fri 16 Jun, 2017 6:47 pm

Oh, as to the dorky look. You actually look like a pro or someone in training for a trek (i still don't use em in the burbs)
Kindly disregard 30% of comments after 5pm
Neo
Phyllocladus aspleniifolius
Phyllocladus aspleniifolius
 
Posts: 538
Joined: Wed 31 Aug, 2016 4:53 pm
Location: Port Macquarie NSW
Region: New South Wales
Gender: Male

Re: Why I hate hiking poles - 80% of the time!

Postby Biggles » Mon 24 Jul, 2017 12:39 pm

One pole is quite sufficient, while two can be useful but be more of a hindrance to pack away. I have two Black Diamond poles but only use one for overnight walking, and one also when photographing with an 18kg pack, carrying a tripod in one hand and lumbering along with a pole in the other. Unlike others who tend to throw caution to the wind and fall and make light of it, I have not had a fall in the time I have been using poles, but then I am very cautious of terrain, including slippery rocks (I usually go through water than chance my luck or fate on large slick boulders).

Poles used correctly, are adjusted in height to suit varying terrain (uphill, downhill), hence the popularity of those poles with quick releases for speed of adjustment.
If you come to a fork in the road, take it.
User avatar
Biggles
Atherosperma moschatum
Atherosperma moschatum
 
Posts: 68
Joined: Thu 14 May, 2009 12:14 pm
Location: Richmond, Geelong & Castlemaine VIC
ASSOCIATED ORGANISATIONS: Otway Ranges Walking Track Association Inc.
Region: Victoria
Gender: Male

Re: Why I hate hiking poles - 80% of the time!

Postby Singe » Mon 24 Jul, 2017 12:51 pm

I guess you either love them or hate them, I've used two poles for years and never found them a bother. Now onto Helinox which are incredible compared to my heavy Fizik ones; easily adjustable, slip-proof and very light.

I'm pretty clumsy, so they've saved me from a fair few falls, and they certainly help with pace especially uphill.

On the OT last June we ran the section from Windy Ridge to the Pine Valley turnoff, no way I could've done that with a fairly heavy pack without poles!

Using them in scrubby tracks is largely down to technique, though of course sometimes it's just not possible. The only time I really find them a hindrance is on raised boardwalk - especially the newer grid stuff made from recycled toner cartridges. At least with planks you have an 80% chance of hitting something solid; the grid squares seem to be designed to grab pole tips!



Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk
“No man ever steps in the same river twice, for it is not the same river and he is not the same man.” -Heraclitus
User avatar
Singe
Athrotaxis cupressoides
Athrotaxis cupressoides
 
Posts: 208
Joined: Wed 30 Apr, 2008 4:45 pm
Region: New South Wales
Gender: Male

Re: Why I hate hiking poles - 80% of the time!

Postby jdeks » Tue 25 Jul, 2017 1:42 am

Okay - this isn't a whinge session, I promise. I'm legitimately here to learn. But permit me some context :

I had a hiking pole once. Used it to keep my tarp off my face when my arms got tired. Only time I ever used it when I wasn't sleeping was to smack up a wild dog who thought I looked tasty. Apparently his snout was stronger than my pole, so I went back to the Mk I Stick after that.

These days, I see people everywhere using them (for walking, not clouting canines), but more often than not they seem to be just tapping along idly at the dirt and giving the operator something to do with their hands. Every time I see people on rocky ascents with poles, it honestly looks like they're more confused by where to put their 4 'limbs' than if they just used their legs. Everyone I've hiked with who uses poles are always continually fussing about with them, and always seem to wind up walking slower anyway. So I never bothered replacing em - just didn't see the point. Spent my money on going light instead. Carbon fiber mosquito nets and pots with lightening holes. That sort of cool stuff.


But they're obviously a thing, so in the interest of learning:

-Whats the technique folks use to really pick up pace with poles on good terrain? I've read that the technique is really important, and it can legitimately speed you up. But I've never seen it in action myself. How do you guys do it?

-Has anyone done any sort of testing to see if their pole usage really does help em in a quantifiable sense? Like do a day hike on the same route with and without poles and compare?

- Do they help even without a pack? I can kindof visualise how if you're supporting extra upper body weight, having 4 ground-base 'limbs' might help, but then I've always addressed that by cutting weight so I've no experience with it.

- Whats the proper title for pole-users? Polers? Polites? Polish? Pollies?
jdeks
Athrotaxis cupressoides
Athrotaxis cupressoides
 
Posts: 137
Joined: Sat 15 Mar, 2014 5:05 pm
Region: Australia

Re: Why I hate hiking poles - 80% of the time!

Postby Orion » Tue 25 Jul, 2017 4:11 am

jdeks wrote:-Whats the technique folks use to really pick up pace with poles on good terrain? I've read that the technique is really important, and it can legitimately speed you up. But I've never seen it in action myself. How do you guys do it?

Basically it's as simple as plant and push. I think of it like cross-country skiing, the way you push alternately with poles in a diagonal stride. Sometimes I double pole while walking, just like when skiing faster. And when I use one pole I sometimes alternate it almost as if I'm rowing a canoe. But metaphors aside, it's really not that complicated. I'm sure you could buy a "how to pole" DVD if you wanted.

jdeks wrote:-Has anyone done any sort of testing to see if their pole usage really does help em in a quantifiable sense? Like do a day hike on the same route with and without poles and compare?

I haven't. It would be an interesting thing to do but unless your time to complete a particular route is very consistent you might have to repeat the experiment to actually see what the difference is. For me, the thing I notice most is that my endurance improves and that often translates into performance over a period of days. A single day out I could push myself and probably do as well or better than with my poles, but I might feel worse, and that's harder to compare than time.


jdeks wrote:- Do they help even without a pack?

Only if you have a non-zero body mass.
Orion
Athrotaxis selaginoides
Athrotaxis selaginoides
 
Posts: 1373
Joined: Mon 02 Feb, 2009 12:33 pm
Region: Other Country

Re: Why I hate hiking poles - 80% of the time!

Postby ChrisJHC » Tue 25 Jul, 2017 10:07 am

Orion wrote:
jdeks wrote:-Whats the technique folks use to really pick up pace with poles on good terrain? I've read that the technique is really important, and it can legitimately speed you up. But I've never seen it in action myself. How do you guys do it?

Basically it's as simple as plant and push. I think of it like cross-country skiing, the way you push alternately with poles in a diagonal stride. Sometimes I double pole while walking, just like when skiing faster. And when I use one pole I sometimes alternate it almost as if I'm rowing a canoe. But metaphors aside, it's really not that complicated. I'm sure you could buy a "how to pole" DVD if you wanted.

There are heaps of videos on YouTube.
ChrisJHC
Athrotaxis cupressoides
Athrotaxis cupressoides
 
Posts: 100
Joined: Sat 25 Feb, 2017 8:22 pm
Region: Victoria
Gender: Male

Re: Why I hate hiking poles - 80% of the time!

Postby Mark F » Tue 25 Jul, 2017 10:11 am

There are several "proper" studies that show the benefits particularly in reducing stress on joints. You do use a bit more energy that just walking and they do improve speed by providing a rhythm. I tend not to use them on day walks but find them invaluable on longer walks.
"Perfection is attained not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing more to remove".
User avatar
Mark F
Athrotaxis selaginoides
Athrotaxis selaginoides
 
Posts: 1583
Joined: Mon 19 Sep, 2011 8:14 pm
Region: Australian Capital Territory
Gender: Male

Re: Why I hate hiking poles - 80% of the time!

Postby puredingo » Tue 25 Jul, 2017 11:20 am

Forget the walking poles...Tell us more about the wild dog assault??!!!
puredingo
Phyllocladus aspleniifolius
Phyllocladus aspleniifolius
 
Posts: 736
Joined: Mon 13 Feb, 2012 6:54 am
Region: New South Wales

Re: Why I hate hiking poles - 80% of the time!

Postby jdeks » Tue 25 Jul, 2017 7:08 pm

Yeah I've done the diligence on the YouTubes, but the theres so may different 'styles', mostly by people who just seem to be making it up as they go, so I've zero idea what actually works. All the methods I've seen in person were by people I quickly walked past sans-poles, so not sure if they've been doing it right either. Thus I'm trying to get an idea of what the most common 'effective' techniques are.


puredingo wrote:Forget the walking poles...Tell us more about the wild dog assault??!!!


viewtopic.php?f=5&t=20257&p=269210#p269210
jdeks
Athrotaxis cupressoides
Athrotaxis cupressoides
 
Posts: 137
Joined: Sat 15 Mar, 2014 5:05 pm
Region: Australia

Re: Why I hate hiking poles - 80% of the time!

Postby Macnut2 » Tue 25 Jul, 2017 9:02 pm

Two poles for me too. I have a bad back and started hiking with poles because I needed all the help I could get. They were awkward at first and I ditched them a couple of times but after a few multi day walks I found my rhythm and really like them. The poles help me stay upright as my back starts to cramp up especially with the weight of a pack on. When I am in the groove I just feel like I am gliding along. Not fast necessarily, but really smooth. As others have said poles are great for uneven surfaces, steep ups/downs and rocky creeks and just leaning on for a bit of a break. A couple of times when my knees have had a work out and something "gives", the poles took the pressure off enough so that I could finish off the track. I also like how the poles engage the whole body and I would find it odd having nothing to do with my hands and arms now.

I can relate to a desire to be hands free though. They can be a bit of a nuisance so it is a trade off. I use the Osprey pack "stow on the go" feature when I need to pack them up for scrambling or in town. I can do it on the move so it is not too bad. I use Leki poles that telescope but have lengths marked so I know exactly where I need to clamp them back in.

I see a lot of people holding their poles incorrectly, gripping with their hands rather than letting the straps do the work. It should be a very relaxed grip most of the time.

As for looking like a dork, I definitely do! I do a 10km quite popular coastal walk every Sunday. It took me such effort to get pack fit I don't want to lose it so I wear my pack and use my poles. I do get some funny looks but I just smile and push on... and start a 6am summer and winter so there are not too many people on the path/track:) It can be a great conversation starter though as other walkers will say hi and ask where your next hike is.

My husband has poles but often leaves them behind if he thinks he won't need them. Funny how many times he has borrowed one of mine for a river crossing or big downhill...
Macnut2
Nothofagus cunninghamii
Nothofagus cunninghamii
 
Posts: 4
Joined: Wed 24 Feb, 2016 12:33 pm
Region: New South Wales

Re: Why I hate hiking poles - 80% of the time!

Postby ChrisJHC » Wed 26 Jul, 2017 10:18 am

Just to close the circle on my own thread...

My last few trips I've made a concerted effort to use poles in various configurations.

I now:
Always use 2 to go up and down steep hills
Always use 2 for uncertain footing (creek crossings, mud, etc)
Use 1 for the flat where there is vegetation or spiderwebs to be moved aside
Use none for the flat where the track is clear
Use none when in town or public places

As many have said, the Osprey pack certainly helps with being able to put them away when not being used but still want them available.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
ChrisJHC
Athrotaxis cupressoides
Athrotaxis cupressoides
 
Posts: 100
Joined: Sat 25 Feb, 2017 8:22 pm
Region: Victoria
Gender: Male

Re: Why I hate hiking poles - 80% of the time!

Postby Watertank » Sat 12 Aug, 2017 10:21 pm

I have a couple of types of poles including the brilliant Pacer poles but they are a little too long when collapsed for packing and travelling overseas with minimal luggage. What poles are favourites for those that use poles that pack down small?
Watertank
Athrotaxis cupressoides
Athrotaxis cupressoides
 
Posts: 175
Joined: Thu 05 Apr, 2012 1:26 pm
Region: Victoria

Re: Why I hate hiking poles - 80% of the time!

Postby Neo » Sun 13 Aug, 2017 7:12 pm

Jdeks some people just fuss.
One pole is just a stick.
With two you get the benefits.
I set my pair at 120cm which is just over 90° at my elbows.
Start walking with your hands down and dragging the pole tips.
Settle into the natural walking arm swing, which is opposite the footstep.
As your arms move the poles will dig in. Always place the pole inline withe the opposite heel or further back. Too far forward and they act like a brake.
and make sure your hands go up and under the strap to grip the handles lightly.

They are great going up, solid going down and give you pace in between if you want.
Kindly disregard 30% of comments after 5pm
Neo
Phyllocladus aspleniifolius
Phyllocladus aspleniifolius
 
Posts: 538
Joined: Wed 31 Aug, 2016 4:53 pm
Location: Port Macquarie NSW
Region: New South Wales
Gender: Male

Re: Why I hate hiking poles - 80% of the time!

Postby Neo » Mon 14 Aug, 2017 4:56 pm

This explanation is awesome:

https://youtu.be/WUoupdz8nLA
Kindly disregard 30% of comments after 5pm
Neo
Phyllocladus aspleniifolius
Phyllocladus aspleniifolius
 
Posts: 538
Joined: Wed 31 Aug, 2016 4:53 pm
Location: Port Macquarie NSW
Region: New South Wales
Gender: Male

Re: Why I hate hiking poles - 80% of the time!

Postby ribuck » Mon 14 Aug, 2017 6:47 pm

Watertank wrote:I have a couple of types of poles including the brilliant Pacer poles but they are a little too long when collapsed for packing and travelling overseas with minimal luggage. What poles are favourites for those that use poles that pack down small?

Any pole that folds down into four sections instead of three ought to do it. I use these Naturehike poles:
https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00KD6LPAU/
ribuck
Phyllocladus aspleniifolius
Phyllocladus aspleniifolius
 
Posts: 595
Joined: Wed 15 May, 2013 3:47 am
Region: Other Country
Gender: Male

Re: Why I hate hiking poles - 80% of the time!

Postby Orion » Tue 15 Aug, 2017 2:53 am

ribuck wrote:Any pole that folds down into four sections instead of three ought to do it. I use these Naturehike poles:
https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00KD6LPAU/

That's a seriously inexpensive pole.
£15 = $25 AUD, or $50 AUD for a pair.

As far as number of sections being the key factor, consider the Black Diamond Distance FLZ poles. They only have three sections but collapse to the same size as those four-section Naturehike poles. They weigh a little less too. But they do cost more than twice as much.
Orion
Athrotaxis selaginoides
Athrotaxis selaginoides
 
Posts: 1373
Joined: Mon 02 Feb, 2009 12:33 pm
Region: Other Country

Previous

Return to Bushwalking Discussion

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot] and 7 guests