Rescuer/first responder successfully sues patient

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Re: Rescuer/first responder successfully sues patient

Postby trekker76 » Fri 08 Feb, 2019 7:05 pm

I have to admit I'm worried about medicine seeming to rush us into an endgame of disorders for all. There are still a range of difficult, challenging, greivious, painful life experiences that do not result in you becoming 'disordered'. In fact you emerge stronger, smarter, happier, more empathetic and better mentally adjusted. Last time I checked thriving in adversity was one of our species strong points....

This ' positive reaction' should be getting at least as much science, research and recognition as the 'disorder' side or we will have a dangerous imbalance in public perception that 'doing your job' leaves you with automatic mental illness. This is one of the most dangerous and stereotyped mindsets people can have about one another. And its all I seem to be hearing from people these days...
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Re: Rescuer/first responder successfully sues patient

Postby slparker » Fri 08 Feb, 2019 10:10 pm

The positive response to stressful situations is termed eustress and is as well known in the psychological literature as PTSD. I think the modern catchcry for is resilience.

PTSD is an aberrant, but not unexpected, response to severely distressing stimuli, direct threat to safety or prolonged exposure to such stimuli. It isnt a new thing, the ancient greeks wrote about the horrific psychological consequences of battle. WW1 and WW2 saw similar rates of post combat psychological injury.

I've met many men who thought that PTSD was a failure of will, masculinity or a problem of gen Y. Many of those men subsequently learnt of their own psychological limits.

Of course PTSD isnt inevitable or automatic but nor is it predictable. Many calm, competent, experienced professionals get it. It seems that everyone has a finite resistance to stressful stimuli. I am not talking here about meeting sales targets I am talking about people under regular physical threat or just see to much violent death or injury.
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Re: Rescuer/first responder successfully sues patient

Postby Xplora » Sat 16 Feb, 2019 12:20 pm

This just in. Research recently conducted by the University of W.A. in partnership with Roy Morgan Research (funded by Beyond Blue) surveyed over 21000 Police, Fire, Ambo and SES Nationally. The results were astounding. One in three experienced high or very high psychological distress compared with one in eight for the general community. Police showed the highest level of mental health conditions and the lowest level of positive well-being with 65% of Police deeply affected by a traumatic event. In spite of this they found 53.5% of Police had a high level of resilience and 36.3% a moderate level.

The study also found a higher level of PTSD with a decreasing sleep level and that Police with 10 years or more service had significantly lower sleep quality compared with those of 2 years service.

There is a lot more but it does not paint a good picture.
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Re: Rescuer/first responder successfully sues patient

Postby trekker76 » Sat 16 Feb, 2019 4:31 pm

slparker wrote:The positive response to stressful situations is termed eustress and is as well known in the psychological literature as PTSD. I think the modern catchcry for is resilience.

PTSD is an aberrant, but not unexpected, response to severely distressing stimuli, direct threat to safety or prolonged exposure to such stimuli. It isnt a new thing, the ancient greeks wrote about the horrific psychological consequences of battle. WW1 and WW2 saw similar rates of post combat psychological injury.

I've met many men who thought that PTSD was a failure of will, masculinity or a problem of gen Y. Many of those men subsequently learnt of their own psychological limits.

Of course PTSD isnt inevitable or automatic but nor is it predictable. Many calm, competent, experienced professionals get it. It seems that everyone has a finite resistance to stressful stimuli. I am not talking here about meeting sales targets I am talking about people under regular physical threat or just see to much violent death or injury.


Wasnt talking about eustress or short term postive stress so much. Being in warzones for example you don't experience much 'eustress'. What I was referring to is more the long term coping, learning and even character building from withstanding very difficult things long term. Doesn't negate the existence of PTSD but it seems public thought is all about the negatives with terms like 'trauma, stress, resilience'. Look at some of the comments , XYZ job= PTSD without question. So I am automatically mentally unwell from army and rescue service , thanks guys lol. They have to dial this back a bit, before every study proves 87.5% of people are unwell from 'stuff'
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