Trekking in the Vic Alps

Victoria specific bushwalking discussion.
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Victoria specific bushwalking discussion. Please avoid publishing details of access to sensitive areas with no tracks.

Trekking in the Vic Alps

Postby mmyers » Mon 14 Jan, 2019 5:38 pm

Hi there,

I'm an experienced trekker and am thinking about some solo treks in the Vic Alps. I'm in my mid 30s female, ex-Army, ex-Police, Iraq and Afghanistan veteran and always walk solo - meaning I can look after myself. So please no fatherly advice. :D

There is an amazing amount of great info and experienced people here, so I would love any advice.

Can anyone suggest any great, remote area, multi day treks, say 7-12 days in the high country of Victoria. Cross country is ok, trail would be a nice comfort zone change for a bit too.

Any tips about logistics would be great.

Thanks bushwalk.com for proving this great forum!

Thanks in advance everyone :)

Michaela
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Re: Trekking in the Vic Alps

Postby Walk_fat boy_walk » Tue 15 Jan, 2019 7:59 am

My Vic experience is limited to say the least (also being ACT-based)... I'm sure plenty of people will point you towards Bogong High Plains/Feathertop etc. which I haven't done (plan to rectify that) so can't comment, but I can thoroughly recommend the area between Buller and Hotham. From cbr you can drive to Upper Howqua or nearby, via Mansfield, and 7+ days will allow you to put together a route that takes in the entire range from the Bluff to Cobbler as well as parts east including the Razor/Viking and Wonnangatta. Fantastic alpine country, lots of ridge-top walking and well suited to solo travel (i did the area solo and loved it)... Most on track but some off, and plenty of up and down :D . If you can get hold of this map you can put together a solid plan: https://map-centre.com.au/product/buller-howitt-alpine-area-map/. But like I said my vic experience is limited so I'll shut up now and defer to the locals...
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Re: Trekking in the Vic Alps

Postby Xplora » Tue 15 Jan, 2019 8:09 am

Firstly, welcome to the forum Michaela.
If you are after remote then there are many options. I am picking up possibly that you are wanting walks with less people also. If that is the case then avoid the Bogong High Plains but in saying that I can still find some solitude by getting to some of the less travelled parts. I don't post them because I want to keep them less travelled.

One of my favourite places is the Crosscut and from there you can explore the Vikings. The Crosscut can get a little busy but go outside a weekend of holiday period and you will be fine. It has the remote feel to it. The Cobberas is also less travelled and particularly remote. Bigkev has done a bit out there and is a good resource on this forum. There are a couple to start with and searching the forum will give you more ideas. Parts of the AAWT would be ideal for you as well.
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Re: Trekking in the Vic Alps

Postby DavidB » Tue 15 Jan, 2019 10:57 am

Hi Michaela

Let me put in a plug for the McMillans Track which I walked last November. You don't have to walk the whole length (220km) but you can do bits of it. See the attached brochure for some more info. The Ben Cruachan Walking Club website is also a good place to visit - http://bencruachanwalkingclub.com/

If you want to do a remote section then the Moroka River is hard to beat. Or you could do a loop walk from Breakfast Creek via Mt Tamboritha and Mt Ligar. Doing parts of McMillans solo means you would have to leave a vehicle somewhere or get dropped off as public transport options are pretty limited (though there is a bus via Cobungra) and there is a weekly service out of Woods Point. I can provide more details if needed.
Attachments
McMillan's Track1864 BCWC brochure.pdf
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Re: Trekking in the Vic Alps

Postby paidal_chalne_vala » Wed 16 Jan, 2019 1:55 pm

You could walk the whole Bogong High Plains as a loop from Bogong village and include Mt. Bogong and Young's top/Bundara river headwaters as well if you are keen .
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Re: Trekking in the Vic Alps

Postby Bushwalkingbruce » Fri 01 Feb, 2019 11:34 am

Hi Michaela.

I just came across your post - hopefully my reply isn’t too late!

If you’re looking for a part of the Victorian Alps that feels really remote I heartily recommend the Cobberas, which are an isolated range right on the NSW border - in fact a few years ago some friends and I did a 5-day hike there in an (unsuccessful) attempt to get to the source of the Murray River.

The range consists of five main peaks, and while they are quite close together the lack of formal tracks (as far as I know the Cobberas are the only mountain range in the Australian Alps which aren’t accessible by either a vehicle track or walking track) makes for really wild walking. As a bonus they managed to escape the fires that swept through large parts of the alps about 15 years ago, so there are some lovely big snow gums to see.

In terms of campsites I’ve camped at two places. Moscow Saddle, which is located in the rough centre of the range, is wide and flat with excellent camping and access to water in the headwaters of Moscow Creek just to the north. We found this to be a wide, swampy kind of soak with gently rubbing water, which required a cup (and a great deal of patience) to collect and transfer to our water bottles. I should also mention there are brumbies in the area so you will need to treat or boil the water, and of course give the rangers a call to see if the creek is running. The other place we camped is on the summit of Mount Cobberas Number 1, the highest peak in the range. There’s no water but there are plenty of places to pitch a tent amongst the snow gums on the summit ridge, and the view is in my opinion the best of any peak in the entire alps, stretching all the way from Mount Kosciusko in the north to Mount Bogong and Mount Feathertop to the south west.
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