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City Of Albany

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Western AustraliaCity Of Albany (15) → Torndirrup National Park | Torndirrup | Mount Clarence
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Map of bushwalks in City Of Albany
List of bushwalks in City Of Albany
Found 15 walks

Lake Seppings Loop
2.8 km circuit
30 min to 1 h
Lake Seppings Loop
2.8 km
Circuit

Walk
30 min to 1 h

Cycle

Mtb

Run
15 min to 45 min

Starting from the Lake Seppings Carpark on Golf Links Road, Seppings, this walk takes you on a circuit around Lake Seppings via the Lake Seppings Bird Walk Trail. Lake Seppings (or Tjuirtgellong, the place of the long-necked turtle) is a natural ecosystem within the city that provides a refuge for local native plants, animals and birds. The lake is regarded as an excellent place for bird watching, particularly for water birds. There have been 100+ bird species seen in and around the lake till now. The lake has a wide variety of vegetation around its margins. Bullrushes, sedges and reeds can be found at the foreshores. The fringing trees are a mixture of Western Australian peppermint trees, spearwoods, paperbarks, native willows and wattles. Banksias are also found around the lake. The information boards at the start of the walk give you an indication of what to expect, and that is mostly that Lake Seppings is a haven for birdlife. Along the route there are lookouts, interpretive signage, rest stops and a bird hide. It doesn't take long to reach the first lookout point, with a small boardwalk section leading out over the water, providing the first glimpses of the lake. A feature of the western side is the bird hide, a small wooden shelter perched over the lake where people can watch birds discretely. The lake narrows toward the southern end, and the path crosses the lake on a natural causeway approximately 250 metres before the southern tip. The last section leading back to the car park runs parallel to Golf Links Road. Towards the end, there's a wooden boardwalk right along the edge of the lake providing stunning views looking across the reeds and over the lake. This is a flat walk on a well-established dirt path, suitable for all ages and fitness levels, with wheelchair access with assistance to some of the lookouts. The Lake Seppings Loop is a thoroughly enjoyable walk for any bird watcher, or those simply looking for an easy walk in a pretty area. This is also a popular spot for locals to walk their dogs. Keep an eye out for snakes in the warmer months. There are multiple intersections without signage around the lake. Turning left at each one if walking anti-clockwise (or right if walking clockwise) will keep you on the basic lake circuit. Let us begin by acknowledging the Traditional Custodians of the land on which we travel today, and pay our respects to their Elders past and present.

Highlights
Views

Environment
Natural

Transport options
To start
Bus
Car


Ellen Cove to the Port of Albany
5.5 km return
1 h to 1 h 30 min
Ellen Cove to the Port of Albany
5.5 km
Return

Walk
1 h to 1 h 30 min

Cycle

Mtb

Run
30 min to 45 min

Wheelchair
1 h to 1 h 45 min

Starting from the car park at the end of Flinders Parade, Middleton Beach, this walk takes you along the Ellen Cove Boardwalk, then to the Port of Albany and back. Commencing at Ellen Cove, a gently sloping boardwalk climbs the hillside, providing incredible views of the King George Sound. The boardwalk transitions to a bitumen path wrapping around Mount Adelaide into Ataturk Channel, arriving finally at the port, where you can head into town or return the same way you came. There are many interesting features dotted along the way, including lookouts, historic buildings, old WWII army bunkers and monuments to past leaders and explorers. At certain times of the year, whales can be seen in the bay. The historic elements complement the absolutely stunning natural scenery, making this one of the best ways to experience the coastline of Albany and immerse yourself in its rich history. The multi-use pathway is a mixture of wooden boardwalk and bitumen path, equally enjoyable whether walking, jogging or cycling. It is also accessible for prams and wheelchair users with assistance. Dogs are permitted on the path only and must be kept on a leash at all times. Let us begin by acknowledging the Minang/Menang Noongar people, Traditional Custodians of the land on which we travel today, and pay our respects to their Elders past and present. 

Highlights
Cafe
Ruins
Swim
Views

Environment
Natural
Urban

Transport options
To start
Bus
Car


Isthmus Hill and Bald Head Hike
12.3 km return
4 h to 6 h
Isthmus Hill and Bald Head Hike
12.3 km
Return

Walk
4 h to 6 h

Starting from the Isthmus Hill and Bald Head carpark off Murray Road, Torndirrup National Park, this hike follows the ridgeline of the prominent Flinders Peninsula via the Isthmus Hill and Bald Head tracks. A short drive from Albany in the South West of Australia provides an opportunity to immerse yourself high above the unyielding power of the Southern Ocean on an ancient peninsula in the Torndirrup National Park. While the park draws plenty of tourists to see natural attractions like The Gap, Blowholes and the Natural Bridge, the Isthmus Hill and Bald Head Hike is the true star of Torndirrup. The first section of the hike is uphill as you climb to the top of Isthmus Hill (121m), where you are greeted with views of Salmon Holes Beach to the south from the bare granite surface. Along the way you will get stunning views of King George Sound, hear the chorus of the waves crashing against the granite cliffs and smell the unmistakable scent of the peppermint trees that line the trail. The hike ends at Bald Head, a round headland of domed granite sloping down into the ocean, rewarding walkers with breathtaking views of the coastline and the Southern Ocean. This is a tough hike to complete, requiring a decent level of fitness. The trail is a mix of boardwalks, sandy tracks, packed limestone paths and hard granite sections, with some steep and challenging sections. The route is fairly well marked with cairns along the way. While it may look like an easy trek, the terrain can be tricky, especially in wet weather. The weather can change rapidly in winter, and during high winds and storms the trail is closed. Keep in mind that the beaches on the side are unpatrolled and may have strong rips(currents). Let us begin by acknowledging the Traditional Custodians of the land on which we travel today, and pay our respects to their Elders past and present.

Highlights
Views

Environment
Natural

Transport options
To start
Car




Found 15 walks