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King Leopold Ranges

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Shire Of Derby-West KimberleyKing Leopold Ranges (24) → Charnley River Private Nature Reserve | Geikie Gorge National Park | Mornington Sanctuary
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Map of bushwalks in King Leopold Ranges
List of bushwalks in King Leopold Ranges
Found 24 walks

Geikie Gorge River Walk and Reef Walk
4.9 km return
1 h 30 min to 2 h
Manning Gorge
6.2 km return
2 h to 3 h
Manning Gorge
6.2 km
Return

Walk
2 h to 3 h

Starting from the Manning Gorge Campground off the Gibb River Road, King Leopold Ranges, this walk takes you to Manning Gorge and back. For camping under a star-filled outback sky, swimming in pristine waters and immersing yourself in Aboriginal history, visit Manning Gorge in the Kimberley region. This adventurous walk takes you to the top of the gorge, following the informal trail markers made up of rock cairns, red discs and arrows. From the campground, Manning Creek needs to be crossed. Visitors may swim across, use the rope-guided dinghy or take a detour around the end of the waterhole, across some swampy sections. The trail follows a route overland rather than along the creek, with great views over the ranges and savanna woodlands along the way. While the first half of the walk is fairly flat and easygoing, there are a few steep, rocky and uneven areas towards the end of the trail. Eventually, you'll emerge at the beautiful gorge, where you can cool down with a refreshing swim. Keep an eye out for Aboriginal art on the gorge walls. There's limited shade on the walk and it can get pretty hot and dusty, so most people choose to head off fairly early in the morning. You'll need to pay the entrance and camping fees at the Mount Barnett Roadhouse before heading to Manning Gorge. Be sure to bring plenty of drinking water and don't forget your hat. Pets are allowed in the campground, but they can't be taken on the gorge walk. Let us begin by acknowledging the Ngarinyin people, Traditional Custodians of the land on which we travel today, and pay our respects to their Elders past and present. 

Highlights
Swim
Views
Waterfall

Environment
Natural

Transport options
To start
Car


Windjana Gorge
8.3 km return
2 h to 3 h
Windjana Gorge
8.3 km
Return

Walk
2 h to 3 h

Starting from the Windjana Gorge Day Use Area off Fairfield-Leopold Downs Road, Windjana Gorge National Park, this walk explores Windjana Gorge via the Gorge Trail. Windjana Gorge is a wide gorge carved out by the Lennard River, with a sandy beach along the river bed. The gorge cuts through the Napier Range, which is part of an ancient reef system. Sheer walls rise up to 100m on either side of the gorge, and ancient fossilized marine creatures can be seen embedded within the limestone of the gorge walls. Rated as one of the most beautiful of all the gorges in the Kimberley region, Windjana is rich in vegetation and wildlife. For the Bunuba people, this gorge is profoundly spiritual as the 'Wandjina' (creation spirits) reside here. Outlaw indigenous leader 'Jandamarra' used to hide here in the 1980s as well. The trail winds its way through the monsoonal strip of vegetation along the permanent pools of water. You can come across freshwater crocodiles in and around the pools, whilst corellas and fruit bats can be found in trees. Freshwater crocodiles are smaller and not as aggressive as saltwater crocodiles, but their teeth are still razor-sharp, so please remain at least 5 metres away from them. Windjana Gorge is a magnificent place that can take up most of your day, so keep in mind that you can camp in the National Park campsite outside the gorge. The track is well-signposted with markers that have a wallaby footprint symbol on them. It is also undulating and sandy in parts, but this is one of the easiest gorges to get into on Gibb River Road. Many elderly people can get into the gorge without too much difficulty. This walk can only be done in the dry season, as the Lennard River is a raging torrent during the wet season. Let us begin by acknowledging the Traditional Custodians of the land on which we travel today, and pay our respects to their Elders past and present.

Highlights
Views

Environment
Natural

Transport options
To start
Car




Found 24 walks