Lakeside Walk

20 min to 1 h

5.3 km
circuit

↑ 8 m
↓ -8 m

Easy track
Starting from Lake Clifton Trambolites Car Park, Herron, this walk takes you on a stroll alongside Lake Clifton. This walk is a peaceful and picturesque one with a historical background. The area is host to ancient thrombolites that you can visit at the beginning. You can also see paperbarks, melaleucas, peppermints and tuarts as you traverse with the open views of the like beside you. It is best to visit the area when the tides are low, and the formations beneath the water can be observed easily. The area is prone to damage and fragile, so you might want to take extra care during your journey. Let us begin by acknowledging the Traditional Custodians of the land on which we travel today, and pay our respects to their Elders past and present.
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Safer Bushwalks
Tips on staying safe on track
Before you start any bushwalk ensure you;
• Tell someone you trust where you are going and what to do if you are overdue
• Have adequate equipment, supplies, skills & knowledge for the whole journey
• Consider the impact of weather forecasts, park/track closures & fire dangers
• Can respond to emergencies & call for help at any point
• Are healthy and fit enough for this journey
If not, change plans and stay safe. It is okay to delay and ask people for help.
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Getting There
Transport options and directions
Start (-32.7451596,115.6559584)
Mode Car
DirectionsFrom Old Coast Road, 1, Herron.
  • Turn on to Mount John Road then drive for 1.9 km
  • Turn left onto Mount John Road and drive for another 470 m
  • Keep left onto Mount John Road and drive for another 15 m
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Track Notes
Turn by turn instructions & maps
Turn map Directions & comments
Start.
Find the car park at the start.
Find the toilet at the start.
After 50 m pass the "The Aboriginal story of the riverways and Lake Clifton" (5 m on your left).
Then pass the "Yalgorup National Park" (6 m on your left).
The starting point of an optional sidetrip. A side trip to visit Lake Clifton Trambolites. To start this optional side trip continue straight here. On returning from this side trip error >360 when you get back to this intersection. Details below.
Turn right, to head along Duckpond Road.
After another 9 m pass the "Walking at Lake Clifton" (5 m on your left).
After another 9 m pass the "Welcome to Noorook Yalgorap (Lake Clifton)" (10 m on your right).
After another 1.4 km turn right.
After another 1.3 km turn left, to head along Duckpond Road.
After another 1.1 km continue straight, to head along Duckpond Road.
The starting point of an optional sidetrip. A side trip to visit Lake Clifton Trambolites. To start this optional side trip turn right here. On returning from this side trip turn sharp right when you get back to this intersection. Details below.
After another 1.4 km turn left.
After another 45 m come to the end.

A side trip to visit Lake Clifton Trambolites.
Turn map Directions & comments
Start.
After another 75 m cross the bridge (about 130 m long)
Then pass the "Thrombolites: Survival in the balance" (on your left).
Then find the "Lake Clifton Thrombolites" (on your left).
Lake Clifton Thrombolites
Lake Clifton Thrombolites

Thrombolites are organo-sedimentary structures that are formed by microbes which trap and bind sediment to form so-called living rocks. Scientists believe that thrombolites are one of the first life forms on earth, dating back approximately 570 million years, producing oxygen that made all subsequent life possible. These relics are mostly extinct and exist only as fossils, with living examples found growing in only a handful of places in the world. The thrombolites at Lake Clifton date back approximately 2,000 years and are the largest in the southern hemisphere. Lake Clifton's thrombolites are very fragile, so an observation walkway has been built for visitors to enjoy these incredible formations while protecting them from damage. The best time to see them is January to May when the water levels are low.
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Thrombolites are organo-sedimentary structures that are formed by microbes which trap and bind sediment to form so-called living rocks. Scientists believe that thrombolites are one of the first life forms on earth, dating back approximately 570 million years, producing oxygen that made all subsequent life possible. These relics are mostly extinct and exist only as fossils, with living examples found growing in only a handful of places in the world. The thrombolites at Lake Clifton date back approximately 2,000 years and are the largest in the southern hemisphere. Lake Clifton's thrombolites are very fragile, so an observation walkway has been built for visitors to enjoy these incredible formations while protecting them from damage. The best time to see them is January to May when the water levels are low.

After another 15 m come to "Looking foreward, looking backwoods".
"Lake Clifton".
Lake Clifton
Lake Clifton

Lake Clifton formed as a narrow estuarine lagoon when the sea level was lower than today. As the ice age ended, the sea rose and dunes formed, isolating the lagoon from the sea. Migrating birds are able to find shelter and food here along with some native species. You may come across numerous types of animals at the foreshores of Lake Clifton. From emus to wallabies and sand goannas. If you have the time, stay for the night as the night sky looks exceptional from this place. And if you're here on a night of a full moon, enjoy the magical phosphorescence.
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Lake Clifton formed as a narrow estuarine lagoon when the sea level was lower than today. As the ice age ended, the sea rose and dunes formed, isolating the lagoon from the sea. Migrating birds are able to find shelter and food here along with some native species. You may come across numerous types of animals at the foreshores of Lake Clifton. From emus to wallabies and sand goannas. If you have the time, stay for the night as the night sky looks exceptional from this place. And if you're here on a night of a full moon, enjoy the magical phosphorescence.

The end.
Turn around and retrace your steps back the 200 m to the main route.
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Terrain
Know the Hills, grading & facilities

Lakeside Walk


Grading
Class 2/6
Easy track
Length 5.3 km
Time 20 min to 1 h
Quality of track Clear and well formed track or trail (2/6)
Gradient Gentle hills with occasional steps (2/6)
Signage Clearly signposted (1/6)
Infrastructure Generally useful facilities (such as fenced cliffs and seats) (1/6)
Experience Required No experience required (1/6)
Weather Weather generally has little impact on safety (1/6)

Some facilities on route
Toilet: There is one 0 m from the start.


Order of key facilities on route
ItemFrom StartName & link to notes
Toilet
0 m[toilet]
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