Old Timberline Rail Trail

6 h, 8 h to 2 days


3 h to 5 h

21.6 km
oneway segment

↑ 267 m
↓ -245 m

Moderate track
Starting from the car park at the end of Brockman Street, Nannup, this walk takes you along a disused tramway formation to Cambray Siding via the Old Timberline Rail Trail. The trail begins at Nannup Foreshore Park and follows the route of the Kauri Timber Company's old tramway, passing through St John Brook Conservation Park for much of its length. After crossing the railway bridge over the Blackwood River, the trail heads southwest to join the tramway formation, then passes by spectacular swimming holes and excellent campsites as it winds its way through stands of mature jarrah forest and along the banks of St Johns Brook. Signs explaining the history of the railway and tramway are scattered along the route between Barrabup Pool and Cambray Siding. Suitable for walking and cycling, the trail is mainly compacted earth and gravel, with some narrow and steep sections where it leaves the tramway formation. Camping is available at multiple points, including an overnight option. There are also several points with vehicle access, so you can choose to walk or ride a shorter section. The area is best visited in late winter or early spring when the wildflowers are blooming and the pools are full after the winter rains. We acknowledge the Noongar people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail is built. Let us begin by acknowledging the Traditional Custodians of the land on which we travel today, and pay our respects to their Elders past and present.
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Safer Bushwalks
Tips on staying safe on track
Before you start any bushwalk ensure you;
• Tell someone you trust where you are going and what to do if you are overdue
• Have adequate equipment, supplies, skills & knowledge for the whole journey
• Consider the impact of weather forecasts, park/track closures & fire dangers
• Can respond to emergencies & call for help at any point
• Are healthy and fit enough for this journey
If not, change plans and stay safe. It is okay to delay and ask people for help.
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Getting There
Transport options and directions
Segment This is part of longer journey and can not be completed on it is own.
Start At the intersection of Munda Biddi Trail & Brockman Street (-33.9759063,115.7619932)
Mode Car
DirectionsFrom Bussell Highway, 10, Busselton.
  • Turn on to Vasse Highway, 104 then drive for 8.1 km
  • Turn right onto Vasse Highway, 104 and drive for another 90 m
  • Turn left onto Vasse Highway, 104 and drive for another 49.1 km
  • Turn right onto Brockman Street and drive for another 400 m
Finish (-33.8793315,115.6785759)
Mode (end)
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Track Notes
Turn by turn instructions & maps
Getting started
From the car park at the end of Brockman Street, Nannup, head towards the information shelters at the northern end of the parking area, keeping Nannup Foreshore Park to your left. Once you've reached the information shelters, head left towards the railway bridge. After crossing the bridge, continue straight ahead for about 250m until you reach a trail junction marked with an 'Old Timberline Trail' sign (to your left). Head left and follow the trail ahead to continue the Old Timberline Trail.....
Turn map Directions & comments
At the intersection of Munda Biddi Trail & Brockman Street Start heading along Munda Biddi Trail (a highway|cycleway).
Find the water tap at the start.
Find the toilet at the start.
This toilet is wheelchair accessible.
Find the Nannup Arboretum at the start.
Find the sign at the start.
Find the picnic table at the start.
At the intersection of Munda Biddi Trail & River Walk continue straight, to head along Munda Biddi Trail.
After another 15 m pass a seat (20 m on your left)., has a backrest.
After another 100 m cross the bridge (about 55 m long)
After another 255 m (at the intersection of Old Timberline Trail & Munda Biddi Trail) turn left, to head along Old Timberline Trail.
After another 510 m (at the intersection of Old Timberline Trail & Barrabup Road) continue straight, to head along Old Timberline Trail.
After another 910 m (at the intersection of Old Timberline Trail & Wildflower Drive) continue straight, to head along Old Timberline Trail.
After another 950 m continue straight, to head along Old Timberline Trail.
After another 1.5 km continue straight, to head along Old Timberline Trail.
After another 2.3 km turn right, to head along Old Timberline Trail.
After another 990 m veer left, to head along Old Timberline Trail.
After another 245 m continue straight, to head along Old Timberline Trail.
After another 420 m turn right, to head along Old Timberline Trail.
After another 75 m (at the intersection of Old Timberline Trail & Mowen Road) veer left, to head along Old Timberline Trail.
After another 1.4 km veer left, to head along Old Timberline Trail.
After another 155 m veer left, to head along Old Timberline Trail.
After another 230 m (at the intersection of Old Timberline Trail & Brook Road) continue straight, to head along Old Timberline Trail.
After another 370 m continue straight, to head along Old Timberline Trail.
After another 10 m find the "Workman's Pool Campground" (7 m on your left).
Workman's Pool Campground
Workman's Pool Campground

Situated close to picturesque river pools, this campsite and day-use area has six designated camping bays, some of which are accessible to small vans. Facilities include toilets, shaded picnic and camping area, picnic facilities and wood barbecues. Campfires are permitted in certain seasons, but campers must bring their own firewood. Campers are advised to bring enough drinking water for the duration of their stay.
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Situated close to picturesque river pools, this campsite and day-use area has six designated camping bays, some of which are accessible to small vans. Facilities include toilets, shaded picnic and camping area, picnic facilities and wood barbecues. Campfires are permitted in certain seasons, but campers must bring their own firewood. Campers are advised to bring enough drinking water for the duration of their stay.

Then pass the toilet (20 m on your left).
After another 1.4 km find the "Barrabup Pool" (35 m on your left).
Barrabup Pool
Barrabup Pool

This naturally formed waterhole on St John Brook is an idyllic spot ​and arguably the highlight of the entire trail. The surrounding tall native trees provide plenty of shade and the tranquil emerald green waters are perfect for swimming and canoeing. A wooden viewing platform provides excellent photo opportunities and is also a good fishing spot. The signage provides an insight into the history of Barrabup Pool and the nearby Workmen's Pool. Back when a sawmill operated at Barrabup, this pool was reserved for the mill manager and his family, while the mill workers had to use Workman's Pool.
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This naturally formed waterhole on St John Brook is an idyllic spot ​and arguably the highlight of the entire trail. The surrounding tall native trees provide plenty of shade and the tranquil emerald green waters are perfect for swimming and canoeing. A wooden viewing platform provides excellent photo opportunities and is also a good fishing spot. The signage provides an insight into the history of Barrabup Pool and the nearby Workmen's Pool. Back when a sawmill operated at Barrabup, this pool was reserved for the mill manager and his family, while the mill workers had to use Workman's Pool.

After another 45 m cross the bridge (about 30 m long)
After another 980 m veer right, to head along Old Timberline Trail.
After another 430 m turn right, to head along Old Timberline Trail.
After another 2.9 km find the "Sleeper Hewer's Camp" (65 m on your right).
Sleeper Hewer's Camp
Sleeper Hewer's Camp

Named after the forestry workers who cut the sleepers for the railway line, Sleeper Hewer's Camp offers excellent facilities, including an overnight hut with bunk beds for up to eight people. The timber hut sits in a clearing, surrounded by additional tent sites, a rainwater tank, toilets and picnic facilities. The shelter features some interesting information about the site and the history of the area. The campsite also has easy access to a lovely swimming hole by the river, with a picnic table overlooking the water.
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Named after the forestry workers who cut the sleepers for the railway line, Sleeper Hewer's Camp offers excellent facilities, including an overnight hut with bunk beds for up to eight people. The timber hut sits in a clearing, surrounded by additional tent sites, a rainwater tank, toilets and picnic facilities. The shelter features some interesting information about the site and the history of the area. The campsite also has easy access to a lovely swimming hole by the river, with a picnic table overlooking the water.

After another 2.6 km continue straight, to head along Old Timberline Trail.
After another 730 m continue straight, to head along Old Timberline Trail.
After another 1.7 km (at the intersection of Old Timberline Trail & Rocky Gully) continue straight, to head along Old Timberline Trail.
After another 60 m (at the intersection of Munda Biddi Trail & Old Timberline Trail) continue straight, to head along Munda Biddi Trail.
After another 350 m find the "Cambray Siding" (10 m on your left).
Cambray Siding
Cambray Siding

Once the site of a small town that was part of the timber industry in the southwest, Cambray Siding is a quiet bush campsite next to some large pools in a tributary of the Blackwood River. The pools were developed to service the steam trains that used the old rail line that was located just to the east of the river. The rail lines are long gone, and apart from a couple of water tanks, there is nothing left where the small settlement once stood. Cambray Siding is accessible via vehicle but has no facilities, so campers must bring everything they need with them. There are flat areas for pitching tents and trees that provide shade, but there isn't any potable water or toilet facilities. The pool has trees and snags, so be careful entering and leaving the water.
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Once the site of a small town that was part of the timber industry in the southwest, Cambray Siding is a quiet bush campsite next to some large pools in a tributary of the Blackwood River. The pools were developed to service the steam trains that used the old rail line that was located just to the east of the river. The rail lines are long gone, and apart from a couple of water tanks, there is nothing left where the small settlement once stood. Cambray Siding is accessible via vehicle but has no facilities, so campers must bring everything they need with them. There are flat areas for pitching tents and trees that provide shade, but there isn't any potable water or toilet facilities. The pool has trees and snags, so be careful entering and leaving the water.

After another 75 m come to the end.
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Terrain
Know the Hills, grading & facilities

Old Timberline Rail Trail


Grading
Class 3/6
Moderate track
Length 21.6 km
Time 6 h, 8 h to 2 days
Quality of track Formed track, with some branches and other obstacles (3/6)
Gradient Short steep hills (3/6)
Signage Directional signs along the way (3/6)
Infrastructure Limited facilities, not all cliffs are fenced (3/6)
Experience Required Some bushwalking experience recommended (3/6)
Weather Weather generally has little impact on safety (2/6)

Some facilities on route
Campsite: There are 3 on route, on average they are 5.4 km apart with the largest gap of 10.4 km.

Toilet: There are 2 on route, on average they are 7.2 km apart with the largest gap of 11.2 km.

Seat: There is one 35 m from the start.


Order of key facilities on route
ItemFrom StartName & link to notes
Toilet
0 m[toilet]
Seat
35 m[seat]
Campsite
10.4 kmWorkman's Pool Campground
Toilet
10.4 km[toilet]
Campsite
16.2 kmSleeper Hewer's Camp
Campsite
21.6 kmCambray Siding
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