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Found 196 walks
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Deep Creek Waterfall from Tent Rock Road
4 km return
1 h 30 min to 2 h
Deep Creek Waterfall from Tent Rock Road
4 km
Return

Walk
1 h 30 min to 2 h

Run
45 min to 1 h

Starting from the Trig Campground on Tent Rock Road, Deep Creek Nation­al Park, this walk takes you to the Deep Creek Waterfall and back via the Deep Creek Waterfall Hike from Tent Rock Road. Deep Creek National Park protects the largest portion of remaining native vegetation on the Fleurieu Peninsula, providing habitat for a diverse range of native wildlife, including west­ern grey kan­ga­roos, short-beaked echid­nas and over 100 bird species. This moderately challenging hike takes walkers down to Deep Creek Waterfall, a secluded waterfall and waterhole oasis nestled in the heart of the park, between the Trig Campground and the Tapanappa Lookout. There are spectacular bushland and coastal views along the way, with steep steps leading to the base of the waterfall towards the end. The waterfall generally only flows in winter and after rains, but the waterhole is permanent. The walk begins at the Trig Campground, which is suitable for tents, car­a­vans, camper vans and camper trailers and has toilets, picnic shelters and fire pits. This hike consists of narrow walking trails, with uneven natural surfaces and short steep hills, suitable for moderate fitness levels. Let us begin by acknowledging the Traditional Custodians of the land on which we travel today, and pay our respects to their Elders past and present.

Highlights
Birdwatching
Views
Waterfall

Environment
Natural

Transport options
To start
Car


Billygoat Falls
4.1 km return
1 h to 1 h 30 min
Goondooloo Ridge
4.2 km return
1 h to 1 h 30 min
Goondooloo Ridge
4.2 km
Return

Walk
1 h to 1 h 30 min

Run
30 min to 40 min

Wheelchair
45 min to 1 h 45 min

Starting from the Goondooloo Ridge Day Visitor Area off Blowhole Beach Road, Deep Creek National Park, this walk takes you to the Goon­dooloo Ridge Lookout and Picnic Area and back via the Goondooloo Ridge Walk. Deep Creek National Park protects the largest portion of remaining native vegetation on the Fleurieu Peninsula, providing habitat for a diverse range of native wildlife, including west­ern grey kan­ga­roos, short-beaked echid­nas and over 100 bird species. This gentle, family-friendly walk meanders through revegetated and remnant native bushland to the newly-built lookout and picnic area at Goon­dooloo Ridge, which offers spectacular views of Aaron Creek Val­ley, Backstairs Passage and Kangaroo Island. On a clear day, the Cape Willoughby Lighthouse can be seen on the island's easternmost point. Kangaroos can often be seen grazing in the open fields or resting under eucalypts along the way. The walk begins at the Goondooloo Ridge Day Visitor Area, which has picnic tables and accessible toilets. This walk consists of wide, gently undulating walking trails, with compacted natural sur­faces, suitable for all fitness levels, as well as prams and wheelchair users with assistance. Let us begin by acknowledging the Traditional Custodians of the land on which we travel today, and pay our respects to their Elders past and present.

Highlights
Birdwatching
Views

Environment
Natural

Transport options
To start
Car


Totness Recreation Park Northern and Southern Loop
4.2 km circuit
45 min to 1 h 15 min
Totness Recreation Park Northern and Southern Loop
4.2 km
Circuit

Walk
45 min to 1 h 15 min

Mtb

Run
20 min to 40 min

Starting from the Gate 1 car park at the end of Milne Road, Totness, this walk takes you on a circuit around the northern and southern sections of Totness Recreation Park. Popular for bushwalking and birdwatching, Totness Recreation Park protects remnant unique vegetation, including stringybark, blue gum and manna gum woodlands, and contains a former railway dam in the northern section, built in 1884 to supply water for steam engines travelling to Victor Harbour. This fairly easy loop initially follows the central fire track to the historic dam, with a boardwalk section across the boggy areas at the edge of the dam. Near the freeway, a creek flows into the dam through a 1.4m tall stormwater pipe, which walkers can head through and explore the larger, more rugged southern section of the park, where there are often fewer people and more wildlife. Continuing along the fire track around the dam, the walk offers glimpses of rural farms and livestock. This loop consists of gently sloping fire tracks and narrow walking trails, suitable for most fitness levels. There are no toilets, facilities, or interpretive signs in the park. Dogs are allowed, but must be kept on a leash. Let us begin by acknowledging the Traditional Custodians of the land on which we travel today, and pay our respects to their Elders past and present.

Highlights
Pets
Views

Environment
Natural
Rural

Transport options
To start
Bus
Car




Found 196 walks
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