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City Of Cockburn

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Western AustraliaCity Of Cockburn (5) → Rottnest Island State Reserve | City of Fremantle | North Coogee
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Map of bushwalks in City Of Cockburn
List of bushwalks in City Of Cockburn
Found 5 walks

South Beach to CY O'Connor Beach
5.8 km return
1 h to 1 h 30 min
South Beach to CY O'Connor Beach
5.8 km
Return

Walk
1 h to 1 h 30 min

Cycle

Mtb

Run
30 min to 1 h

Wheelchair
1 h 15 min to 1 h 45 min

Starting from the car park next to the Fremantle Sailing Club off Marine Terrace, South Fremantle, this walk leads to CY O'Connor Beach in North Coogee and back. This beautiful walk takes you down the coast from the South Fremantle Dog Beach, through the South Beach Recreation Reserve and the CY O'Connor Reserve, ending at CY O'Connor Beach near the old power station in North Coogee. South Beach is a family-friendly beach with superb views of the Rottnest, Carnac, and Garden islands. The spacious beach is separated into two distinct areas. The north section is dog-friendly and also has access to grassy areas around it. The beach is lined with small sand dunes leading to landscaped parkland, walk and bike trails, bathing facilities, parking, barbecues, a children's playground and a great cafe. South Beach is renowned for its exceptional sunsets. As you continue the walk past South Beach, you'll come across CY O'Connor Beach. CY O'Connor Beach includes the SS Wyola steam tug shipwreck off the coast and a designated dog beach. There are two reserves along CY O'Connor Beach. The northern reserve features a fantastic SS Wyola inspired playground. Access to the dog beach is located right in front of the playground area. Almost all of the facilities are at McTaggart Cove, the southern end of the beach. Enjoy a swim followed by a picnic or barbecue at the grassy reserve afterwards. The flat shared-use path is great for walking, jogging and cycling, and is also suitable for wheelchairs. There are multiple cafes along the way where you can enjoy a coffee or a meal overlooking the ocean. Take a leisurely stroll along the white sandy shores at the end of your walk, and enjoy a magical sunset over the Indian Ocean. Let us begin by acknowledging the Traditional Custodians of the land on which we travel today, and pay our respects to their Elders past and present.

Highlights
Cafe
Swim
Views

Environment
Natural
Urban

Transport options
To start
Bus
Car


Bibra Lake Loop
6.1 km circuit
1 h 30 min to 2 h
Bibra Lake Loop
6.1 km
Circuit

Walk
1 h 30 min to 2 h

Cycle

Mtb

Run
45 min to 1 h 15 min

Wheelchair
1 h 30 min to 2 h 30 min

Starting from the Bibra Lake Reserve Carpark on Progress Drive, Bibra Lake, this walk takes you on a circuit around the perimeter of Bibra Lake. Bibra Lake Reserve is a great place for a range of outdoor activities, as there is a 6km cycle and walking path around the whole lake, with clear markings all the way around. The reserve has a thriving population of ducks, swamp hens, swans and many other birds. On the western side of the lake, a bird hide on a floating pontoon provides great bird watching opportunities in a tranquil setting. There is also a short jetty to walk along, which has nice views over the lake. Shaded picnic areas, barbecues, toilets and change rooms are available for those wanting to spend more time here. Drinking fountains and toilets can be found on both sides of the lake. There's a great adventure playground for the children, with features and designs that draw on local wildlife, fauna and aboriginal heritage. There is also a food van parked near the playground selling various cuisines, drinks, ice cream and coffee. The cement path is suitable for wheelchairs and prams due to it having mild slopes rather than steps. All of the facilities have been designed to be fully accessible to people with a disability. Dogs on a lead are welcome in the reserve, but are not permitted inside the fenced area of the playground. Keep an eye out for your children and pets at all times, as some sections of the track are next to the road. Let us begin by acknowledging the Traditional Custodians of the land on which we travel today, and pay our respects to their Elders past and present.

Highlights
Views

Environment
Natural
Urban

Transport options
To start
Bus
Car


Rottnest Island Road Biking
27.6 km circuit
6 h to 11 h
Rottnest Island Road Biking
27.6 km
Circuit

Walk
6 h to 11 h

Cycle
2 h to 5 h

Mtb
2 h to 5 h

Run
3 h to 5 h 30 min

Starting from Pedal & Flipper on Bedford Avenue, Thomson Bay Settlement, this road biking circuit takes you around Rottnest Island via Parker Point Road, Bovell Highway and Digby Drive. Just thirty minutes west by express ferry from Fremantle lies the beautiful island of Rottnest. With pristine white-sand beaches, tranquil swimming bays and vibrant reefs, Rottnest Island is one of Western Australia's most popular travel destinations. The island is home to colonies of Australian sea lions and southern fur seals and is also well known for its population of quokkas, a small native marsupial found in very few other locations. Many of the island's buildings date from the colonial period, often made from locally quarried limestone, and are now used as accommodation for holidays. The main settlement at Thomson Bay has the best food and drink options with the famous Rottnest Bakery, Rottnest Hotel and a raft of food options in the main mall. Outside of the main settlement, the only places that sell food and drinks are Geordies Cafe at Geordie Bay and Pinky's Beach Club near Bathurst Lighthouse. Rottnest has a loop road linking up the main parts of the island, with a bus running frequently during the day and bus stops at regular intervals. Cars are not allowed on the island, and most visitors either walk or ride bicycles. Cycling is a scenic way to see the island, and you can hire a bike there or bring your own. From Thomson Bay, the cycling path passes Kingstown, then cruises along the southern end of the island, passing Porpoise Bay and Salmon Bay. There are optional detours to Wadjemup Lighthouse and Mary Cove on the way to Cape Vlamingh, the southwestern tip of the island. Pedalling on from Cape Vlamingh, the cycling path heads along the northern end of the island, passing Stark Bay, Catherine Bay, Parakeet Bay, and Geordie Bay. The path continues past the Rottnest Island Golf Course, leading back to Thomson Bay to complete the loop. The island is well signposted, maps are readily available and the roads are relatively flat, with some short hills. Rottnest Island is only 11km long, suitable for cyclists of any level to explore at least a good portion of the island within a single day. With plenty of options to explore and breathtaking ocean views along the way, cycling around Rottnest Island is an excellent adventure. Let us begin by acknowledging the Traditional Custodians of the land on which we travel today, and pay our respects to their Elders past and present.

Highlights
Cafe
Swim
Views

Environment
Natural

Transport options
To start
Ferry




Found 5 walks