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Namadgi National Park

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Snowy Valleys CouncilNamadgi National Park (13) → District of Paddys River | District of Cotter River | District of Booth
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Map of bushwalks in Namadgi National Park
List of bushwalks in Namadgi National Park
Found 13 walks

Mount Franklin Walking Track
3.1 km return
1 h to 1 h 30 min
Mount Franklin Walking Track
3.1 km
Return

Walk
1 h to 1 h 30 min

Starting from the car park off Mount Franklin Road, Cotter River, this walk takes you to the summit of Mount Franklin and back via the same-titled walking track, visiting the Franklin Shelter near the start. With unique views and instant access to the wilderness, this walk through the forest will surely make you feel remote in a matter of minutes. But before heading deeper into the woodland, you’ll visit the Franklin Shelter. This shelter was built to remember and honor the Franklin Chalet, which was significant to Canberrans that were skiing in the Brindabellas. Built in 1938 to serve the Canberra Alpine Club, the cozy chalet was lost to the bushfires in 2003. After the historic visit, you’ll walk along the former ski runs which can be overgrown up to the summit. Expect to see beautiful views of the western ACT from this point. Walk to any direction you want to get less obstructed views, but remember to keep the Trig Point as a reference not to get lost. You can take a right turn from the Trig Station(coming from the walking track) and head along the subtle dirt track to see the rusty Austin A40, which was used as an engine for the ski tow. Keep in mind that there is no reception in the area, so inform others beforehand. Let us begin by acknowledging the Traditional Custodians of the land on which we travel today, and pay our respects to their Elders past and present.

Highlights
Ruins
Views

Environment
Natural

Transport options
To start
Car


Bendora Arboretum Track
3.5 km return
1 h 15 min to 1 h 45 min
Bendora Arboretum Track
3.5 km
Return

Walk
1 h 15 min to 1 h 45 min

Mtb

Run
40 min to 1 h

Starting from Mount Franklin Road, Brindabella, this walk takes you to the Bendora Arboretum and back via Chalet Road(a management road), visiting the historic Bendora Hut as well. Notice the change of smell as you walk through different tree sections in the arboretum as you enjoy the natural views and ambiance. 52 different tree species were planted in groups of 81 when the arboretum was first established in 1940. You can get into the details whilst exploring the arboretum as there are plenty of informative signposts at each section. Don’t miss out on the views over the valley while you’re focused on reading the said signposts. The historic Brenda Hut is there to welcome you to the arboretum, with some benches and a fireplace inside. Some people say that it was built in the early 1940s to serve as a shelter for the Forestry and Timber Bureau workers at the time. Others claim it was built in 1930 by Ted Kennedy for laborers building the road. The arboretum provides an entirely different experience in each season, from deciduous trees shedding their leaves to a silent white blanket over the land. Try to photograph each season to make them into a collage that you can proudly represent on your wall. Keep in mind there is no signal reception in the area, so make sure you inform others prior to the journey. Let us begin by acknowledging the Traditional Custodians of the land on which we travel today, and pay our respects to their Elders past and present.

Highlights
Views

Environment
Natural

Transport options
To start
Car


3 Hut Circuit (Hospital Creek, Frank and Jacks & ACT Forests huts)
5.6 km circuit
2 h 45 min to 4 h 30 min
The Settlers Loop
9.2 km circuit
2 h 30 min to 4 h
The Settlers Loop
9.2 km
Circuit

Walk
2 h 30 min to 4 h

Starting from the David Brayshaws Hut off Boboyan Road, Mount Clear, this walk takes you on a circuit near the southern border of Namadgi National Park, visiting 3 historic huts in the process. David Brayshaws Hut will be your first stop on this journey, which was built in 1903 by Edward Brayshaw for grazing purposes. It was the home of Davey Brayshaw, who lived here until the end of his life(1931). Shortly after came Henry and Iris Curtis, working timber and fibro in the early 1930s. The hut was comprehensively renovated in the late 1980s. After visiting the first hut on the journey, you’ll leave the rural area and head into the eucalypt woodland along the track. You may come across kangaroos and wallabies throughout the hike, but you have to be stealthy to take close-up pictures as they’re not used to walkers. As you make it out of the forest and past the creek, the historic Waterhole Hut will appear in the distance. It has some old sheep yards and horse stalls nearby for you to explore. From here, the track meanders along Grassy Creek towards the Westermans Homestead. Known for its nostalgic bargeboards and stone chimneys, this hut was built in 1916 by Bruce Jeffrey. Two family members of the Westermans are buried up the hill. Keep an eye out for the Octopus Stinkhorn, a fungus that looks like an upside-down octopus(hence the name) with red tentacles. As a ‘plus’, it smells like cow dung. If you decide to come here in summer, cover yourself well and bring an insect repellent to be protected from the relentless flies. In winter on the other hand, remember to check the forecast to be safe against storms and drastic temperature drops. Expect to get wet feet in some areas around the walk regardless of the season, so an extra pair of socks or waterproof boots may come in handy. Let us begin by acknowledging the Traditional Custodians of the land on which we travel today, and pay our respects to their Elders past and present.

Highlights
Ruins
Views

Environment
Natural
Rural

Transport options
To start
Car


Grassy Creek Fire Trail
13.9 km oneway
3 h 30 min to 6 h
Grassy Creek Fire Trail
13.9 km
Oneway

Walk
3 h 30 min to 6 h

Starting just metres away from the ACT-NSW border on Boboyan Road, Mount Clear, this walk takes you through the scenic rural areas and eucalypt woodlands of Namadgi National Park via the creekside Grassy Creek Fire Trail, visiting multiple historic huts along the way as you follow Grassy Creek. Ending at Old Boboyan Road near Naas Creek, this walk can also be done in reverse. Famous for its gorgeous bargeboards and stone chimneys, Westermans Homestead is going to be your first historic stop. Enjoy the rural areas of the walk as you’re following Grassy Creek, then take the side trip to Waterholes Hut if you want to see some old sheep yards and horse stalls. After skirting the border and entering the eucalypt forest area, you’ll come across the Lone Pine Homestead. Supposedly built around 1890 by Dan Crawford, it was home to him and his family of seven. Some say the pine tree might have been planted at the same time the hut was built. Your last historic stop is the Luton’s Crutching Shed, if you’re willing to take the side trip out to it. Built around 1964, it was used to remove excess wool from the rear of the sheep. If you’re here in winter, please check the forecast to be safe against storms and drastic temperature drops. Also, expect to get wet feet in some areas around the walk, so an extra pair of socks or waterproof boots may come in handy. Let us begin by acknowledging the Traditional Custodians of the land on which we travel today, and pay our respects to their Elders past and present.

Highlights
Ruins
Views

Environment
Natural
Rural

Transport options
To start
Car

From end
Car




Found 13 walks