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Shire Of Ashburton

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Western AustraliaShire Of Ashburton (14) → Karijini National Park | Karijini | Millstream
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Map of bushwalks in Shire Of Ashburton
List of bushwalks in Shire Of Ashburton
Found 14 walks

Joffre Gorge
1.2 km return
1 h 30 min to 2 h
Joffre Gorge
1.2 km
Return

Walk
1 h 30 min to 2 h

Starting from the Joffre Gorge car park off Knox Gorge Road, Karijini National Park, this walk takes you past Joffre Lookout, Joffre View, down into the gorge to Joffre Falls and back via the Joffre Lookout, Joffre View and Joffre Waterfall trails. This walk is a great initiation to the gorges of Karijini, taking visitors down into the base of the Joffre Gorge to view the spectacularly carved amphitheatre created by the flowing water of Joffre Falls. You can start this track either from the Karijini Eco Retreat or the Joffre car park. The viewing platform provides great views of the gorge, and if you want to continue to the rock pool downstream, there's a challenging track waiting for you. The track crosses the water near the top of the waterfall. After that, a steep scramble will take you into the gorge. The descent is not for people who are afraid of heights, requiring walkers to negotiate their way down a series of ledges and narrow platforms. Making it down the cliff will definitely be rewarding, but only if you are experienced enough and have proper footwear. Once at the base, make sure you head right and follow the stream to the spectacular natural amphitheatre and swimming hole of Joffre Falls. From there, it's a short but steep climb retracing your steps back to the car park. You may find the climb up less demanding as it's usually easier to take it slow and balance yourself whilst going up. If you'd like to refrain from some risky acrobatic work, you can simply visit the lookout and view the falls and the amphitheatre. The falls are dry for most of the year, so check the forecast and try to visit after some rainfall. Take care in the gorge and leave if it starts to rain as flash flooding can occur. Let us begin by acknowledging the Traditional Custodians of the land on which we travel today, and pay our respects to their Elders past and present.

Highlights
Swim
Views
Waterfall

Environment
Natural

Transport options
To start
Car


Kalamina Gorge
1.9 km return
1 h 30 min to 2 h
Kalamina Gorge
1.9 km
Return

Walk
1 h 30 min to 2 h

Starting from the car park at the end of Kalamina Road, Karijini National Park, this walk takes you past Kalamina Falls, then along Kalamina Gorge to Rock Arch Pool and back. Arguably the most underrated gorge walk in Karijini National Park, Kalamina Gorge is one of the lesser-known attractions due to it being located deep within the park. While not as deep as the other gorges, Kalamina makes up for it by offering a unique and picturesque experience of stunning reflections on still pools and glowing red walls. Kalamina Gorge has more trees and plants than most gorges in the national park, making the area around its watercourse shaded and more picturesque. You'll come across a track that will take you to a seasonal waterfall after descending into the gorge via the man-made steps. Although the waterfall is seasonal, the rock pool there is permanent. To explore the gorge further, it's a relatively easy walk through the gorge itself, following the watercourse downstream past rock pools and beautiful rock walls to Rock Arch Pool. You'll need to use the stepping stones a few times to pass the creek. The walk is largely on uneven, rocky and unmodified terrain. The gradients are gentle, with only a short, steep descent into the gorge. The circle markers attached to the rock will guide you along which side of the gorge you are meant to be walking along. Keep an eye out for spots to swim as there are many along the way, with deep and clear water. Drinking water, toilets and an information shelter are present at the car park. The combination of wide gorge walking, the beauty of Rock Arch Pool and the relaxed nature of the hike make this a perfect walk for adventurous young families. Let us begin by acknowledging the Traditional Custodians of the land on which we travel today, and pay our respects to their Elders past and present.

Highlights
Swim
Waterfall

Environment
Natural

Transport options
To start
Car


Knox Gorge
2.7 km return
2 h to 3 h
Knox Gorge
2.7 km
Return

Walk
2 h to 3 h

Starting from the Knox Gorge car park at the end of Knox Gorge Road, Karijini National Park, this walk takes you past Knox Lookout, then down into Knox Gorge and back via the Knox Lookout and Knox Gorge Walk Trails. Intersecting Wittenoom Gorge near the Knox Lookout, Knox Gorge is a deep and picturesque chasm. After a short walk to the lookout, the trail descends to the bottom of the gorge via one of the steepest paths in the park. Other gorges in the area have proper steps, yet the track going down Knox Gorge is a bit more "natural" and challenging. Although steep, the descent is relatively straightforward until an awkward scramble near the bottom, which requires walkers to lower themselves down several rock shelves. At the bottom of the descent, there is the option to turn left or right, with the path to the right leading to a photogenic pool. After heading left along the main walk trail, the initial section of Knox Gorge is filled with trees and plants growing along the watercourse. Continually crisscrossing its way along the gorge floor, the trail ends at an unusual slot canyon formation with large, expansive shelves on either side of the slot. From here, walkers can retrace their steps back to the start of the walk. After the scrambling ends, the steep track takes you out of the gorge. Take care in the gorge and leave if it starts to rain as flash flooding can occur. Let us begin by acknowledging the Traditional Custodians of the land on which we travel today, and pay our respects to their Elders past and present.

Highlights
Swim
Views

Environment
Natural

Transport options
To start
Car


Dales Gorge Loop
3.1 km circuit
1 h 30 min to 2 h 30 min
Dales Gorge Loop
3.1 km
Circuit

Walk
1 h 30 min to 2 h 30 min

Starting from the Fortescue Falls Carpark on Dales Road, Karijini, this walk takes you on a circuit around Dales Gorge via the Gorge Rim Walk and Fortescue Falls Track. One of the most satisfying walks in Karijini National Park, this walk combines all the trails in Dales Gorge into a scenic loop. The first of many viewpoints is a short walk from the car park and shows off the views down towards Fortescue Falls. From there, the trail snakes its way along the edge of the gorge walls, providing spectacular views across the landscape to the distant hills. After passing the Dales Gorge Lookout, the trail descends steeply to a wide expanse at the bottom of the gorge, where you can take a short detour and visit the Circular Pool. The pool is not very large, but the massive amphitheatre-like space, lush green ferns and trickling water make it a truly magical spot. After visiting Circular Pool the trail widens, contracts, skirts and snakes its way through the gorge with plenty to see and photograph on the way to Fortescue Falls. Fed by a spring, Fortescue Falls is one of the few permanent waterfalls in the park, flowing even in drier years. As this place is in a spacious natural amphitheatre, you won't have problems finding a scenic place to sit. The trail continues past Fortescue Falls, crossing a series of stepping stones to reach the other side of the gorge's watercourse, where the trail forks off to either Fern Pool or up the stairs to the car park. One of the most beautiful pools in the park, Fern Pool features a small waterfall and a wooden deck platform that allows visitors easy access for swimming. From Fern Pool, the trail heads back towards Fortescue Falls and up the metal staircase towards the car park. As the longest gorge hike in Karijini, Dales Gorge is a true delight to explore thanks to the many different side trails and swimming spots, and the full loop experience provides excellent coverage of both the gorge rim and valley floor. The trail is well-marked and requires minor rock hopping and water crossings. Dales Gorge features a few seams of blue asbestos along its walls, and while it is safe in its unprocessed natural state, visitors are advised not to break off or touch any of these formations. Keep in mind that the gorges are at high risk for flash floods. Let us begin by acknowledging the Traditional Custodians of the land on which we travel today, and pay our respects to their Elders past and present.

Highlights
Swim
Views
Waterfall

Environment
Natural

Transport options
To start
Car


Mount Bruce Summit Trail
9.5 km return
4 h to 6 h
Mount Bruce Summit Trail
9.5 km
Return

Walk
4 h to 6 h

Starting from the Mount Bruce Carpark at the end of Mount Bruce Road off Karijini Drive, Karijini National Park, this walk takes you to the summit of Mount Bruce and back via the Mount Bruce Summit Trail. A lone and topographically prominent mountain, Mount Bruce is a major sight driving along Karijini Drive. Standing 1,234 metres above sea level, it is Western Australia's second tallest peak. This walk is not for the faint-hearted, alternating between relatively easy, gentle gradients and sections of difficult terrain requiring scrambling. There's a good mix of steps, walking over rolling hills, scrambling up rocky sections and rugged ridge walking. 500 metres into the walk is the Marandoo View, a viewpoint overlooking the nearby Marandoo Mine. From the Marandoo View lookout, the trail traverses over a series of small rolling hills, with Mount Bruce looming ahead in the distance. Even from these lower hills, the views are quite spectacular, with the mountains of the Hamersley Range stretching out in all directions. Before reaching any truly steep sections, the trail passes through a section of rectangular boulders that require some mild scrambling to get through. This rocky section doesn't last long before returning to fairly straightforward walking along the clearly defined walk track. The trail crosses one more rolling hill before beginning the first truly steep incline up Chinaman's Hat, with the trail running as a series of switchbacks up the mountain. As the track approaches a rock face, a chain bolted to the rock helps walkers along a narrow, exposed ledge. You'll need to scramble up a near-vertical climb after going up a narrow chute. Although it is close to vertical, the climb is actually a fairly straightforward scramble, as there are an abundance of hand and footholds all the way up the climb. Beyond the chute, there are a number of smaller scrambles before returning to a well-defined trail along the ridge connecting Chinaman's Hat to Mount Bruce itself. There are excellent views of Mount Bruce from the ridge, and although there are a few scrambles along the way, the walking is relatively easy. The final climb to the top of Mount Bruce follows a series of switchbacks through dense bush. The summit is marked by an impressively large cairn. Near the summit cairn, there is an informative plate identifying the many mountains surrounding Mount Bruce. Explore the summit and take in the beautiful panoramic views before making your way back down the mountain. Almost entirely downhill, the return journey is faster and easier than the walk-up. While the scrambling means this walk won't be for everybody, fans of adventurous mountain walks will find a lot to love about the Mount Bruce Summit Trail. The trail is generally clear and well defined, with sections on uneven, rocky and unmodified terrain. Some parts of the trail require a high level of fitness and experience, but this challenging walk will reward you with spectacular views of the landscape. Try not to climb in the middle of the day in summer as it can get pretty hot. Sturdy hiking boots are recommended. Be sure to take plenty of drinking water and sun protection. Let us begin by acknowledging the Traditional Custodians of the land on which we travel today, and pay our respects to their Elders past and present.

Highlights
Views

Environment
Natural

Transport options
To start
Car


Camel Trail
15.3 km return
4 h to 6 h
Camel Trail
15.3 km
Return

Walk
4 h to 6 h

Starting from the Python Pool car park off Roeburn-Wittenoom Road, Millstream-Chichester National Park, this walk takes you to the summit of Mount Herbert and back via the Camel Trail. Linking the stunning Python Pool to the lookout at Mount Herbert, this historic trail follows part of an old route used by cameleers to lead their camels to reliable water sources. The Camel Trail winds up the rugged basalt and sandstone escarpment of the Chichester Ranges through rolling spinifex covered hills and large termite mounds, passing McKenzie Spring before heading to the summit of Mount Herbert. There are a couple of benches along the way that allow you to stop for a rest and take in the view of the surrounding landscape. Most of the walk is fairly straightforward, but there are a few unclear moments when the trail's camel-emblazoned markers are helpful in confirming that you've taken the right path. Even in the more difficult section up to Mount Herbert, the Camel Trail is surprisingly gentle and makes for a perfect introduction to walking in the Australian Outback. Although the trail is relatively easy, walkers should take care as there are some natural obstacles, uneven surfaces and rocky sections. If you're not going to walk out & back, it may be a good idea to start from Mount Herbert. If you're planning on returning to your starting spot on the other hand, begin from Python Pool. Let us begin by acknowledging the Traditional Custodians of the land on which we travel today, and pay our respects to their Elders past and present.

Highlights
Swim
Views

Environment
Natural

Transport options
To start
Car




Found 14 walks