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Shire Of Plantagenet

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Stirling Range National ParkShire Of Plantagenet (5) → Porongurup National Park | Porongurup | Shire Of Cranbrook
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Map of bushwalks in Shire Of Plantagenet
List of bushwalks in Shire Of Plantagenet
Found 5 walks

Talyuberlup Peak
2.5 km return
2 h to 3 h
Talyuberlup Peak
2.5 km
Return

Walk
2 h to 3 h

Starting from the Talyuberlup Car Park on Stirling Range Drive, Stirling Range National Park, this walk takes you to the summit of Talyuberlup Peak and back via the Talyuberlup Peak Walk Trail. The walk up Talyuberlup Peak starts with a gentle uphill stroll through Talyuberlup mallee and Veronica's wattle. This rather mild incline turns into a steep and slippery scramble in no time. Once at the base of the cliff face, you follow the trail up to a large cave, which goes through the mountain. The track circles around the cave to the west. You'll get to a broad clifftop after passing by the said cave. Keep an eye out for the rocky spires on your way to the summit as well. Spend some time on the summit exploring the area and admiring the views before heading back down the rocky scramble into the valley. Although there is little signage along the way, the path is easy to discern and wooden pegs have been put in place to guide walkers in the more confusing areas. Trekking poles are recommended as the path can be slippery underfoot. The scrambling requires free hands, with some of the rocks being somewhat slippery and requiring a bit of thought to pick the safest route. Walking is not recommended in wet or windy conditions or in extreme heat. Talyuberlup Peak is definitely a very hard walk, best suited for experienced bushwalkers. However, the challenge is entirely worth it, as the rocky terrain of the mountain's peak makes this a walk of truly rugged beauty. If you are up for an adventure in the Stirling Ranges, then this is truly one of the best. Let us begin by acknowledging the Traditional Custodians of the land on which we travel today, and pay our respects to their Elders past and present.

Highlights
Caves
Views

Environment
Natural

Transport options
To start
Car


Castle Rock Granite Skywalk
4.3 km return
1 h 30 min to 2 h
Castle Rock Granite Skywalk
4.3 km
Return

Walk
1 h 30 min to 2 h

Starting from the Castle Rock Carpark on Castle Rock Road, Porongurup, this walk takes you to the Granite Skywalk on the summit of Castle Rock. The Granite Skywalk is a suspended walkway that spirals around giant granite boulders, and is truly a marvel of engineering as it clings to a vertical rock face at the summit of Castle Rock. The 2km hike up from the Castle Rock picnic area passes through Jarrah, Marri and Karri forest and by Balancing Rock to reach the base of Castle Rock and the lower lookout. As you ascend the peak, you're likely to encounter some of the region's 78 species of birds and 700 flowering plants, including many rare and extraordinary orchids and lichen varieties. Reaching the upper lookout requires scrambling over rocks and climbing a 7 metre ladder. The last part of the climb, just before reaching the ladder to the Skywalk, involves a rugged climb through a rocky crevice. A series of grab handles bolted onto the granite adds another layer of fun to the experience. If you can manage the scramble, you'll be rewarded with spectacular views of the surrounding peaks of the Porongurups, the Stirling Range to the north, Mount Manypeaks to the south-east and the undulating farmland towards Albany and Mount Gardner. The hike to the Skywalk is a steep ascent along a rocky path with some obstacles, featuring more rock steps as the gradient becomes steeper. Sturdy walking shoes are recommended, as the trail has a decent amount of loose terrain and can become slippery when wet. The final climb requires some arm and leg strength, and an aptitude for heights. One of the most unique experiences in the South West, the Granite Skywalk is a great finish to a challenging hike. The steep hike through dense forest, the exhilarating climb up to the Granite Skywalk and the unparalleled views from the summit make this a very enjoyable and rewarding experience. Let us begin by acknowledging the Traditional Custodians of the land on which we travel today, and pay our respects to their Elders past and present.

Highlights
Views

Environment
Natural

Transport options
To start
Car


Mount Magog
5.8 km return
3 h to 4 h
Mount Magog
5.8 km
Return

Walk
3 h to 4 h

Starting from the car park off Stirling Range Drive, Stirling Range National Park, this walk takes you to the summit of Mount Magog and back via the Mount Magog Walk Trail. One of the lesser-known hikes in the Stirling Range, Mount Magog is a challenging climb to 856 metres. This summit gives off an uncharted feel as it is not climbed frequently. The walk starts at a picnic site nestled amongst tall wandoo trees. From here, the trail crosses a creek, then emerges from the trees and meanders across open country along the flat lowlands of the range, with only gentle climbing. Once the trail reaches the base of the peak, the climb is steep and tough. For those willing to push on, this will be an unforgettable experience. The reward for the climbing becomes apparent fairly early on, with excellent views of the peaks to the west. Eventually, the trail leads to a saddle between the summit and the neighbouring Talyuberlup. From here it's a more gentle walk, with some scrambling up rocky shelves to reach the top of Mount Magog's south peak. The trail to the summit is fairly easy to follow, with wooden peg markers and flagging tape to point hikers in the right direction. This is a very hard walk in steep and potentially dangerous terrain known for its unpredictable weather. You'll need to keep an eye out for scree and uneven footing. For your safety, keep to the path and be mindful about foot placement. The trail may be overgrown, and the final section requires some rock scrambling. This walk isn't recommended in wet or windy conditions, as the rock scrambling sections can be very slippery. Let us begin by acknowledging the Traditional Custodians of the land on which we travel today, and pay our respects to their Elders past and present.

Highlights
Views

Environment
Natural

Transport options
To start
Car




Found 5 walks