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Found 346 walks
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Bicton Baths to Point Walter
6 km return
1 h to 2 h
Bicton Baths to Point Walter
6 km
Return

Walk
1 h to 2 h

Run
40 min to 1 h 15 min

Wheelchair rough
1 h 15 min to 2 h 15 min

Starting from the car park off Braunton Street, Bicton, this walk takes you along the Swan River past Bicton Baths and the Point Walter Sandbar. Bicton Baths is biologically quite diverse, and there are many marine animals and plants that reside here. The water here is crystal clear, so it's a beautiful spot for a swim and a picnic, and a great alternative to a day at the beach. Facilities at the adjacent park include barbecues, public toilets and a playground. You can walk along the river for most of the way, and after passing by Blackwall Reach, the foreshore is all yours. Don't forget to check out the top of Blackwall Reach though, as this is a favourite spot for adventurous people to jump off into the river. Once you reach Point Walter, you can walk out on the sandbar if the tide is low. The sandbar extends about 1 kilometre into the river and is a popular fishing spot. Be aware that parts of the sandbar are often submerged, and the drop into the water where boats cross and the bank ends can be quite deep. There's a café located on the Point Walter foreshore where you can enjoy a meal or beverage overlooking the river, before heading back the same way. Let us begin by acknowledging the Traditional Custodians of the land on which we travel today, and pay our respects to their Elders past and present.

Highlights
Cafe
Swim
Views

Environment
Natural
Urban

Transport options
To start
Bus
Car


Bibra Lake Loop
6.1 km circuit
1 h 30 min to 2 h
Bibra Lake Loop
6.1 km
Circuit

Walk
1 h 30 min to 2 h

Cycle

Mtb

Run
45 min to 1 h 15 min

Wheelchair
1 h 30 min to 2 h 30 min

Starting from the Bibra Lake Reserve Carpark on Progress Drive, Bibra Lake, this walk takes you on a circuit around the perimeter of Bibra Lake. Bibra Lake Reserve is a great place for a range of outdoor activities, as there is a 6km cycle and walking path around the whole lake, with clear markings all the way around. The reserve has a thriving population of ducks, swamp hens, swans and many other birds. On the western side of the lake, a bird hide on a floating pontoon provides great bird watching opportunities in a tranquil setting. There is also a short jetty to walk along, which has nice views over the lake. Shaded picnic areas, barbecues, toilets and change rooms are available for those wanting to spend more time here. Drinking fountains and toilets can be found on both sides of the lake. There's a great adventure playground for the children, with features and designs that draw on local wildlife, fauna and aboriginal heritage. There is also a food van parked near the playground selling various cuisines, drinks, ice cream and coffee. The cement path is suitable for wheelchairs and prams due to it having mild slopes rather than steps. All of the facilities have been designed to be fully accessible to people with a disability. Dogs on a lead are welcome in the reserve, but are not permitted inside the fenced area of the playground. Keep an eye out for your children and pets at all times, as some sections of the track are next to the road. Let us begin by acknowledging the Traditional Custodians of the land on which we travel today, and pay our respects to their Elders past and present.

Highlights
Views

Environment
Natural
Urban

Transport options
To start
Bus
Car


Lucky Bay Beach Walk
6.1 km return
1 h to 2 h
Lucky Bay Beach Walk
6.1 km
Return

Walk
1 h to 2 h

Starting from the Lucky Bay Campground off Lucky Bay Road, Cape Le Grand National Park, this walk takes you along Lucky Bay Beach, past Lucky Bay Lookout, then to the Flinders Monument and back. Lucky Bay is quite iconic and maybe the most popular of all the pristine beaches in Esperance. Aside from having the whitest sand in Australia, Lucky Bay is also famous for its friendly resident kangaroos that love to hang out on the beach. There are over five kilometres of glistening white beachfront to explore, and the turquoise waters are ideal for enjoying water-based activities. Swimming and surfing in this gorgeous bay will surely be rewarding. On the other hand, having a relaxed and quiet fishing session can take your mind of the daily struggles of life. To truly appreciate the beauty of this area, a walk along the beach to the Lucky Bay Lookout is a must, culminating with a spectacular view of the azure waters and pristine landscape. After basking in the beauty of the area, continue further along the beach to view the commemorative plaques paying homage to Matthew Flinders' landing in Lucky Bay in 1802. If you're in a 4WD, you can also drive on the beach, but be careful of soft sand and the rising ocean tide. Check with the ranger about surface conditions and tides, remember to drive slowly and beware of pedestrians and the wildlife that abounds the area. Let us begin by acknowledging the Traditional Custodians of the land on which we travel today, and pay our respects to their Elders past and present.

Highlights
Cafe
Swim
Views

Environment
Natural

Transport options
To start
Car


Len Howard Conservation Park Trail
6.2 km circuit
1 h 30 min to 2 h
Len Howard Conservation Park Trail
6.2 km
Circuit

Walk
1 h 30 min to 2 h

Run
40 min to 1 h

Starting from the car park off Dampier Ave, Erskine, this walk takes you on a circuit within Len Howard Conservation Park via the Erskine Nature Trail. Len Howard Conservation Park is a hidden gem for bird watching in Mandurah. Explore the lovely Len Howard Conservation Park along the Erskine Trail and discover Mandurah's natural heritage and the region's internationally significant Peel-Yalgorup Wetlands, including the remarkable wildlife that calls them home. Walk through diverse habitats including remnant old growth swamp paperbark and banksia coastal woodland, and travel along boardwalks meandering through a network of samphire saltmarshes. You will have lots of chances to spot some waterbirds as the trail meanders along the shoreline. There is an artificial nesting platform along the trail where you can come across breeding ospreys. Some of the birds you may see include the Chestnut Teal, Banded Stilt, Red-necked Avocet, Whimbrel, Eastern Curlew, Sharp-tailed Sandpiper, and Regent Parrot. This walk can be a great choice for families. The track has a compacted dirt surface with a gentle, mostly flat gradient and some slightly overgrown, narrow and sandy sections. The walk can be done as a shorter 1.2km circuit or extended with a walk to the beautiful Peel Inlet beach near the Mandurah Quay Resort. Let us begin by acknowledging the Traditional Custodians of the land on which we travel today, and pay our respects to their Elders past and present.

Highlights
Cafe
Pets
Views

Environment
Natural

Transport options
To start
Bus
Car


Manning Gorge
6.2 km return
2 h to 3 h
Manning Gorge
6.2 km
Return

Walk
2 h to 3 h

Starting from the Manning Gorge Campground off the Gibb River Road, King Leopold Ranges, this walk takes you to Manning Gorge and back. For camping under a star-filled outback sky, swimming in pristine waters and immersing yourself in Aboriginal history, visit Manning Gorge in the Kimberley region. This adventurous walk takes you to the top of the gorge, following the informal trail markers made up of rock cairns, red discs and arrows. From the campground, Manning Creek needs to be crossed. Visitors may swim across, use the rope-guided dinghy or take a detour around the end of the waterhole, across some swampy sections. The trail follows a route overland rather than along the creek, with great views over the ranges and savanna woodlands along the way. While the first half of the walk is fairly flat and easygoing, there are a few steep, rocky and uneven areas towards the end of the trail. Eventually, you'll emerge at the beautiful gorge, where you can cool down with a refreshing swim. Keep an eye out for Aboriginal art on the gorge walls. There's limited shade on the walk and it can get pretty hot and dusty, so most people choose to head off fairly early in the morning. You'll need to pay the entrance and camping fees at the Mount Barnett Roadhouse before heading to Manning Gorge. Be sure to bring plenty of drinking water and don't forget your hat. Pets are allowed in the campground, but they can't be taken on the gorge walk. Let us begin by acknowledging the Ngarinyin people, Traditional Custodians of the land on which we travel today, and pay our respects to their Elders past and present. 

Highlights
Swim
Views
Waterfall

Environment
Natural

Transport options
To start
Car


Wardanup Trail Loop
6.3 km circuit
1 h 30 min to 2 h
Wardanup Trail Loop
6.3 km
Circuit

Walk
1 h 30 min to 2 h

Run
45 min to 1 h 15 min

Starting from the Rabbit Hill Carpark at the end of Dawson Drive, Yallingup, this walk takes you on a circuit up Wardanup Hill, past Ngilgi Cave and along Yallingup Beach via the Wardanup Trail. A favourite with the locals, this picturesque 6.4 kilometre loop walk encompasses both coastal scenery and shady forest paths. You'll head along the cliff line that will provide you countless panoramic views. Keep an eye out for surfers as well. The trail climbs steeply up over Wardanup Hill through coastal peppermint forest, then heads down to Ngilgi Cave, an amazing Karst cave system with a beautiful array of varied crystal formations enhanced by colourful lighting. The trail then descends into the Yallingup Brook valley and the Yallingup township, passing the spectacular Yallingup reef and onto Yallingup Beach, where you walk along the sand before climbing back up to the Rabbit Hill Carpark. The Wardanup Trail is best suited for moderately experienced hikers due to the changing terrain that includes a sandy beach, dense forest coverage, steep hillsides, cliffs, and coastal rocks. Sturdy walking/hiking boots are recommended to handle the different ground coverings. The trail is open to the public every day, has restroom facilities and resting areas to take in the changing views or just to sit and enjoy a bottle of water and a snack. The loop trail is clearly defined and well signposted, with orange markers to guide you along the way. Let us begin by acknowledging the Traditional Custodians of the land on which we travel today, and pay our respects to their Elders past and present.

Highlights
Cafe
Caves
Swim
Views

Environment
Natural

Transport options
To start
Car




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